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I need to find Vce Would this be correct way of solving it? I got 7.551V for Vce enter image description here

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Rather long-winded and your schematics didn't have reference names for components nor voltage node names (that you referred to) so no, it isn't an ideal way of solving it. Even if your answer is correct there are so many variables in transistor manufacture that trying to estimate a precise value is pointless so, a much simpler approach would produce a valid number that would be in the ballpark spread of likely real values. \$\endgroup\$
    – Andy aka
    Commented Aug 23, 2020 at 9:53
  • \$\begingroup\$ I get 7.903 V as an answer for Vce, using Vbe=700 mV and beta=120. But this just shows that you are getting most of it right and good enough for me. This flows from:$$V_\text{CE}=18\:\text{V} - \frac{18\:\text{V}\cdot\frac{8.2\:\text{k}\Omega}{8.2\:\text{k}\Omega+38\:\text{k}\Omega}-700\:\text{mV}}{\frac{38\:\text{k}\Omega\cdot 8.2\:\text{k}\Omega}{8.2\:\text{k}\Omega+38\:\text{k}\Omega}+121\cdot1\:\text{k}\Omega}\cdot\left(121\cdot 1\:\text{k}\Omega+120\cdot 3.3\:\text{k}\Omega\right)$$Which is just your \$V_\text{CC}\$ supply, less the two drops across the collector and emitter resistors. \$\endgroup\$
    – jonk
    Commented Aug 23, 2020 at 14:47

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Your answer is practically correct. The real Vbe voltage will never be exactly 0.7 V (just 0.63V in the simulation), resulting in minor differences. (As with the other parameters and temperature.)

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