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I am making these batteries into a battery pack, and want to put heat shrink tubing around my batteries for a more professional look. Would the heat that it takes to shrink the my PVC heat shrink tubing (walmart.com) be damaging to the batteries in any way?

If so, do you suggest any other methods of heating / types of heat shrink tubing that would be better to use instead? How would I apply the necessary temperature to shrink PVC heat shrink-tubing (80℃) to a pack of Li-ion batteries without damaging them?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Apply the heat quickly and be done with it. \$\endgroup\$ – mkeith Aug 27 '20 at 4:30
  • \$\begingroup\$ The way I see it, use a hot gun. The tube will shrink quickly until it touches the battery and then it will stop shrinking because the tube is cool. You want to apply the necessary amount of energy as quickly as possible. The battery will not be damaged unless the separator hits around 90 degrees C which is quite hot. Do not keep heating the tubing after it touches the battery all the way around. \$\endgroup\$ – mkeith Aug 27 '20 at 4:38
  • \$\begingroup\$ Which Li-ion batteries? \$\endgroup\$ – Bruce Abbott Aug 27 '20 at 6:13
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The batteries have a higher specific heat capacity than the heatshrink and the heatshrink should shield the hot air from the PCB while it is not tight. So don't keep pointing the heatgun at it once the heatshrink has closed around the battery and don't point the heatgun at anything until it has warmed up. Heatshrink will also continue to shrink a bit after you remove the heatgun since it will still be hot, just not as fast so you can actually remove the heatgun early.

You also don't have to point the heatgun continuously at it the whole time. Once the heatgun is warmed up you can quickly wave it around and remove it and watch the heatshrink shrink a bit and come back again at it.

If you're worried, get a block of aluminum or steel and heatshrink it. When you're done measure the temperature of the metal and see how you did. Cut it off with a knife, then try again. Don't rely on the actual temperature number since the thermal mass will be different than your batteries, but it will give you an idea of how much you are heating up the heatshrink versus the stuff under it.

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