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I bought a car inverter (150W.) The inverter output should be 220V 50Hz (in Turkey) but the output is 227V 46Hz. I think the voltage is at a reasonable value but is the frequency OK? I measured the values with the power meter. When I measured the normal home socket with the same power meter, I saw 222.5V 50Hz.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ What load are you attempting to power? Different types of devices have different sensitivity to frequency issues. \$\endgroup\$ – nanofarad Sep 2 at 19:49
  • \$\begingroup\$ I tried to desk lamp (15W) and fan (60W). also i tried without load. I saw the same value in these three different measurements. \$\endgroup\$ – Ahmet Açıksarı Sep 2 at 21:16
  • \$\begingroup\$ Note that the real issue may be the shape of the AC coming from your inverter, rather than the frequency -- depending on your power meter, it may or may not read frequency accurately for the non-sinusoidal power coming out of your inverter. \$\endgroup\$ – Glenn Willen Sep 3 at 7:30
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Obviously your inverter is a cheap inverter that only outputs an AC frequency that is only approximately 50 Hz but not exactly.

You need a more expensive ("pure sinewave") inverter to get a more accurate 50 Hz.

The fact that you the frequency isn't exactly 50 Hz is only a problem with devices that rely on the 50 Hz to be accurate because they use the 50 Hz as a reference for timing.

Some motors need AC to make them spin, if the frequency isn't exactly 50 Hz the motor could spin too slow or too fast.

Examples of such devices are clocks and maybe some older televisions.

Devices that are unaffected are devices that rectify the AC into DC like power adapters and chargers. Some devices state that they can use 50 / 60 Hz on the device itself, also these don't care much about the exact frequency.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ i got it, thank you @Bimpelrekkie \$\endgroup\$ – Ahmet Açıksarı Sep 2 at 21:05

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