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I'm pretty new to electrical work in general and was wondering how I would open and close a solenoid valve. It says on the specifications that it needs 12 VDC. Do I just take a 12 volt battery and put each wire on the battery (is it that simple)? I've seen people wire up push buttons and Ardiunos which is getting me confused. What would be the simplest way? Do I need all these complicated parts or can I literally just use a battery? Thanks for any explanation to a noob like me, this stuff is pretty intimidating. This is the image of the solenoid valve I have.

enter image description here

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Are you sure it is a 12V DC? But the label says "Copper Coil AC220V! Your following comment is a bit too casual: "The image provided is a pretty good estimation of how it looks like (color of wires and stuff are different but it looks like this)." \$\endgroup\$ – tlfong01 Sep 6 '20 at 9:36
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    \$\begingroup\$ The image above is not the same one I bought, the one I bought said 12 dc on the label. Sorry for the confusion I should have pointed that out. \$\endgroup\$ – import_hill Sep 6 '20 at 9:39
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    \$\begingroup\$ I have since edited the post to show the exact solenoid valve I have, now how would I power this(turn it on and off). I believe it is 12v but you can look on the label for the specs yourself. Please take a look again and give me your judgment. \$\endgroup\$ – import_hill Sep 6 '20 at 9:49
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    \$\begingroup\$ Hello, thank you for the inspection, when you do get back. I meant to say if I could literally just use a solenoid and a battery without any extra parts. To switch it on could I just connect the two wires directly to the battery without having to buy a switch. I'm looking for the simplest way and I don't want to have to solder or buy any buttons or switches. \$\endgroup\$ – import_hill Sep 6 '20 at 9:58
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    \$\begingroup\$ Ha, yes, the simplest way is not using any switch, but just use your hand to connect the 12V battery to the solenoid valve. USUALLY 12VDC battery (don't use wall wart, which might leak electricity) won't give you a electric shock (assuming you don't have a pace maker in your body). WARNING: me friend hobbyist only. No guarantee no nothing won't melt down or blow up. Good luck, good health, God bless you. Cheers./ \$\endgroup\$ – tlfong01 Sep 6 '20 at 10:04
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If the solenoid says 12 VDC on the label, then you can operate it with a 12 V battery. As the solenoid is terminated in two wires, you can just touch the wires to the battery terminals. This assumes the battery is beefy enough to provide all the current that the solenoid tried to draw.

Caution, if you hold one wire in each hand as you disconnect the battery, you may feel a shock. This is due to the inductance of the solenoid producing a high voltage as the current decays quickly on disconnection.

Most people would want something a little more tidy than just connecting wires to the battery. At a minimum, most would chose to use a switch in series.

schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

If you want to control the solenoid from something, then a relay or transistor will often be used in series as a switch.

Remember that shock you might have got when disconnecting the solenoid. Whatever switches the solenoid, whether it's a switch, relay or transistor, will also get that high voltage on switching off. If it's a high enough rated switch or relay, the metal contacts will not suffer damage, but a weedy relay or transistor needs to be protected by a diode. This is where some of the complications that you refer to come in.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Sorry for replying on such short notice. If possible what would be the simplest circuit you were mentioning with the switch for a noob like me? I don't think I'm ready for any relays or Arduino code so I was wondering you it's not too much of a hassle to provide some circuit diagrams for how to wire the switch in series with the power supply and solenoid. Thank you for your explanation it was very informative and I think I might need to use a switch to prevent shocking myself. \$\endgroup\$ – import_hill Sep 7 '20 at 18:24
  • \$\begingroup\$ @HillmanSETYO A circuit diagram for how to wire the switch? Really? I'll add it as it also shows how to use a diode to protect against the disconnect voltage transient. \$\endgroup\$ – Neil_UK Sep 7 '20 at 18:56

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