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bindind posts

These things called binding posts came with my breadboard. How am I supposed to use them? Should I screw them into the back plate?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Yes. Usually they come with lock washers. If not I'd add them. Any order, but, Red, Green Black. \$\endgroup\$ Sep 7, 2020 at 18:57
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks everyone. I attached my result as an answer because I didn't know how to make a pic in a comment \$\endgroup\$
    – Mark
    Sep 7, 2020 at 19:12
  • \$\begingroup\$ I use red for +, black for -, but what about green? \$\endgroup\$
    – Mark
    Sep 7, 2020 at 19:14
  • \$\begingroup\$ It's a ground terminal because usually power supplies have three terminals, +, - and ground. \$\endgroup\$ Sep 7, 2020 at 19:16
  • \$\begingroup\$ Oh is that to be able to supply negative voltage on the minus terminal? \$\endgroup\$
    – Mark
    Sep 7, 2020 at 19:22

2 Answers 2

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Yes, screw them into the matching holes. You'll note that the have an integral insulating washer-like section that keeps them from shorting against the metal plate.

You would typically use these for transmitting power from a bench supply to the breadboard. So you could put two wires under the screw part, one to the supply and one jumper to the breadboard, or you could use test leads with banana plugs on the ends.

The latter obviously can short to things when unplugged (so best to leave them plugged into the breadboard and unplug them from the supply if necessary) and also note that the bottoms of the binding posts are connected to the supply pins so if you have a messy workbench with conductive stuff underneath, Bad Things might happen.

The binding posts are useful in that they nail down incoming power leads fairly well so they don't get accidentally unplugged and go flailing around potentially shorting to something bad.

If you're getting your power from a barrel jack or one of those nifty USB power supply modules you can ignore them or use them for signal wires.

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I think I attached them in a way that makes sense

enter image description here

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