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In Mona's Digital Design book,

Chapter 5 outlines the formal procedures for analyzing and designing clocked (syn- chronous) sequential circuits. The gate structure of several types of flip‐flops is presented together with a discussion on the difference between level and edge triggering. Specific examples are used to show the derivation of the state table and state diagram when analyzing a sequential circuit. A number of design examples are presented with empha- sis on sequential circuits that use D‐type flip‐flops. Behavioral modeling in Verilog HDL for sequential circuits is explained. HDL Examples are given to illustrate Mealy and Moore models of sequential circuits.

Chapter 6 deals with various sequential circuit components such as registers, shift registers, and counters. These digital components are the basic building blocks from which more complex digital systems are constructed. HDL descriptions of shift registers and counter are presented.

Chapter 7 deals with random access memory (RAM) and programmable logic devices. Memory decoding and error correction schemes are discussed. Combinational and sequential programmable devices such as ROMs, PLAs, PALs, CPLDs, and FPGAs are presented.

Chapter 8 deals with the register transfer level (RTL) representation of digital sys- tems. The algorithmic state machine (ASM) chart is introduced. A number of examples demonstrate the use of the ASM chart, ASMD chart, RTL representation, and HDL description in the design of digital systems. The design of a finite state machine to con- trol a datapath is presented in detail, including the realistic situation in which status signals from the datapath are used by the state machine that controls it. This chapter is the most important chapter in the book as it provides the student with a systematic approach to more advanced design projects.

I was wondering what relation is between memory (RAM, ROM) and PLD (ROM, PLA, PAL, CPLD, FPGA) in Ch 7, and the other topics such as (synchronous) sequential circuits in Ch 5, their specific examples registers and counters in Ch 6, and the register transfer level (RTL) representation of digital systems in Ch 8, if any?

  • Are memory and PLD in Ch 7 some examples or applications of (synchronous) sequential circuits in Ch 5?

  • Are memory and PLD in Ch 7 introduced as alternatives to the storage elements (latches, and flip-flops) introduced in (synchronous) sequential circuits in Ch 5, and therefore are they used in (synchronous) sequential circuits?

Thanks.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Think about where you find memories, especially those of the addressable multi word type you seem to be asking about. \$\endgroup\$ Sep 20, 2020 at 13:45
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks. Could you be more specific and explicit? If any confusion, I was asking about what relation is between memory/PLD and (synchronous) sequential circuits. \$\endgroup\$
    – Tim
    Sep 20, 2020 at 13:55
  • \$\begingroup\$ Still I am not sure what your comments meant, as far as my questions are concerned. \$\endgroup\$
    – Tim
    Sep 20, 2020 at 14:45
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    \$\begingroup\$ You are not really asking a proper design question for this site. There isn't really a "relation" between the technologies. If you have a design project where you need to use both, then you'll have to think about how they might interact. Or you could spend some time thinking about how these things are actually used in useful systems. It's worth noting you are relatively unlikely to design synchronous circuitry today, and not simply buy it condensed into a chip - custom synchronous circuitry (in an FPGA, etc) is mostly used in specialized niche applications and school-like projects. \$\endgroup\$ Sep 20, 2020 at 15:12
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    \$\begingroup\$ That's the problem: they aren't related. The only way this makes any sense is to consider their possible interaction in a system. You need to stop thinking in terms of the book, and start thinking in terms of the sorts of real systems it is describing distinct parts of. Consider for example how a classic stored-program computer works. \$\endgroup\$ Sep 20, 2020 at 16:14

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Re: "I was wondering what relation is between memory (RAM, ROM) and PLD (ROM, PLA, PAL, CPLD, FPGA), and the other topics such as (synchronous) sequential circuits"

These are all things that you might use to create (synchronous) sequential circuits.

Re: "Are memory and PLD some examples or applications of (synchronous) sequential circuits"

PLDs can be either asynchronous, or synchronous.

Memory often used to be asynchronous, but these days it is more commonly synchronous. Even the asynchronous ones were used in circuits that were largely synchronous.

Re: "Are memory and PLD introduced as alternatives to the storage elements (latches, and flip-flops) introduced in (synchronous) sequential circuits,

PLDs may well include latches, and flip-flops. You would use a PLD as an alternative to discrete logic chips, and possibly latches, to form part of a circuit.

Memory is like a very large array of latches, although the implementation might be substantially different. There are spoecific cases where you could memory in place of latches. Think of memory as a warehouse and a latch as a storage box, then consider how you would think of them as alternatives.

Re: "and therefore are they used in (synchronous) sequential circuits?" Yes, they are used in (synchronous) sequential circuits.

I have not read the book that you mention. The outline sounds perfectly reasonable. The detail, I don't know.

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