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I seem to remember that in the EU, lithium cells may not be sold to consumers and may not be user-replaceable in consumer devices.

This vague idea seems to be supported by the fact that I cannot recall a single product that used e.g. user-replaceable 18650 cells.

Can somebody explain the basics of EU regulations regarding user-replaceable lithium cells?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I doubt very much there are any; I live in The Netherlands and I can buy as many Li-ion cells as I want here. Products that take them are for sale here as well. \$\endgroup\$ – ocrdu Sep 25 '20 at 18:16
  • \$\begingroup\$ Radio control modellers routinely buy and build their own packs. \$\endgroup\$ – DKNguyen Sep 25 '20 at 18:23
  • \$\begingroup\$ In the US, consumer lithium cells are targeted for consumer roles, so there are 3.6v "camera" cells, etc. The more regulated, exotic types (mercury, lithium thionyl chloride, etc.) are generally not available on store shelves, except as niche batteries, for such uses as hearing-aids (if they still use mercury for those.) To get the rarer types, they must be ordered, but can be found, and as far as I know are unregulated. Here is a list of some EU battery directives which might point you in the right direction. \$\endgroup\$ – rdtsc Sep 25 '20 at 18:46
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I Think you are wrong... Smartphones, MP3 Players, Notebooks, fire detectors... all with non replaceable Li-Ion based batteries... same shit here in EU than anywhere in the world

Also you can buy single lithium cells of any kind (18650 cells are normal) - You can even send em by post.

Its just most devices with exchangeable batteries support normal 1,5V cells

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