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It is said when current is circulating in the secondary of the transformer due to connected load, a flux is produced by the secondary current that is "seen" by the primary thus a current is drown in the primary to counter the secondary current. What I am confused about is, if the secondary current produces a flux it should have an inductance right? what is this inductance? the same would apply for the primary winding : when the primary current flows it counters the one that it is produced by the secondary. So does it have an inductance? If so where these inductance are shown in the equivalent circuit of an ideal transformer? I dont know but of course I am missing something.

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    \$\begingroup\$ No, your opening sentence is wrong. The current that produces magnetization and hence induces the secondary voltage is at 90 degrees to secondary load current that would flow through a resistive load. Start again and think about what you say. Try not to assert anything that is wrong. I’m saying this because for you to understand a proper answer, you have to jump over this misconception. MMF is produced by amps and turns and fundamentally is not due to inductance. \$\endgroup\$
    – Andy aka
    Sep 28, 2020 at 21:22
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks for your feedback. What I meant is that the secondary current produces a flux that reduces the main flux which is produced by the magnetizing current \$\endgroup\$
    – Tonylb1
    Sep 28, 2020 at 21:28
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    \$\begingroup\$ Read Alfred Centauri's answer here: electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/135407/… \$\endgroup\$ Sep 28, 2020 at 21:41
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks. In a real transformer what would be the inductance of the primary and secondary? \$\endgroup\$
    – Tonylb1
    Sep 28, 2020 at 21:57
  • \$\begingroup\$ No, the secondary current doesn’t alter in one bit the magnetization flux. Not a jot. Not even 0.000001%. Zero effect. Doesn’t touch it. No effect whatsoever. That is why I’m not answering your question because it’s based on an incorrect assertion. \$\endgroup\$
    – Andy aka
    Sep 28, 2020 at 22:17

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