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I'd like to use a slide switch to switch an output between one of three inputs. However, I'm having trouble understanding which pin is the pole and which pins are the throws. Here's a link to the switch I'm planning to use, and here's the drawing datasheet. This is an on-on-on switch, which I believe means that at any given time, the switch connects the pole to one throw and leaves the other two open. Here's an image of the switch:

enter image description here

My guess is that the 3 gold-colored pins to the right are the throws and the single pin on the left is the pole. However, this is based purely on the fact that these three pins are grouped together and separated from the fourth pin. Additionally, I'm guessing that the black slide switch is positioned (relatively) above the throw shorted to the pole. I use relatively here because the plastic sliding piece seems to be centered (not above the throws). So, the leftmost position (as in the picture) would indicate shorting between the pole and leftmost of the 3 rightmost pins.

Unfortunately, I can't find confirmation of this on the linked datasheet. There's also a product guide, but I didn't see an indication there either. Is my assessment correct? Did I miss something on the datasheet, or is there a standard here that I'm not aware of?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I would say that your guess is correct. You can easily check this with an Ohmmeter. Measure resistance between pins with the switch in each position. \$\endgroup\$ Oct 6, 2020 at 2:23
  • \$\begingroup\$ Use a multi meter to confirm the pins. If you don't have one available, use a LED and a 1k resistor and a 9V battery all connected in series. \$\endgroup\$ Oct 6, 2020 at 2:24
  • \$\begingroup\$ That said - my past experience with switches of that style is that the pin furthest away from the group of 3 pins is the movable contact. It is will make contact with one of pins in the group of 3 pins. \$\endgroup\$ Oct 6, 2020 at 2:26
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yeah using an ohmmeter would be a good way to check. I was hoping not to have to purchase the switch before the rest of the components and board, though. But, if necessary that is an option. \$\endgroup\$
    – MattHusz
    Oct 6, 2020 at 2:27
  • \$\begingroup\$ When I design a PC board, I ALWAYS want any parts that may have "odd" footprints in my hand before making the footprints, so I can measure the part and verify the size and connections. \$\endgroup\$ Oct 6, 2020 at 2:58

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Here's the switching scheme.

enter image description here

The sliding contact of the switch bridges the fixed contacts (terminals) 1 & C, C & 2 and C & 3 in positions 1,2 & 3 respectively.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Did this information come from the datasheet? I didn't see that figure on the drawing datasheet. Mind explaining how you figured this out / where the information comes from? \$\endgroup\$
    – MattHusz
    Oct 6, 2020 at 14:00
  • \$\begingroup\$ It's shown in the chart on sheet 1 of the drawing datasheet. The pictorial of the switch with the 3 knob positions is shown in alternate columns in the bottom-most row. The connected pins in those positions is shown in the upper rows. I drew the switching scheme pictorial to make it easier to understand. \$\endgroup\$
    – vu2nan
    Oct 6, 2020 at 14:29
  • \$\begingroup\$ Ah there it is. Nicely spotted. \$\endgroup\$
    – MattHusz
    Oct 6, 2020 at 14:33
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you, MattHusz. \$\endgroup\$
    – vu2nan
    Oct 6, 2020 at 14:34

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