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What kind do I replace this with?

enter image description here

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    \$\begingroup\$ A broken one... Are you sure it's even a diode? What is the reference number? \$\endgroup\$
    – Ron Beyer
    Oct 13, 2020 at 0:39
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    \$\begingroup\$ Please supply better picture(s), closer in and different angles. What is printed on the ident. Do you have another board which is not broken? Why is there another board underneath? \$\endgroup\$
    – mhaselup
    Oct 13, 2020 at 0:58
  • \$\begingroup\$ Well, I was trying to fix a zoom H1 handy recorder because of a diode burst, and I think it says Gs or Cs on the diode. \$\endgroup\$ Oct 13, 2020 at 1:53
  • \$\begingroup\$ I just need to know what kind of diode to get to replace it because I don't know how many different kinds there are. The size of it is 2x1.2 mm \$\endgroup\$ Oct 13, 2020 at 1:56
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    \$\begingroup\$ Oh hey it's you again. I will measure the diode on my good Zoom H1 and get back to you \$\endgroup\$
    – crossroad
    Oct 13, 2020 at 2:09

1 Answer 1

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This is not a diode, but a tantalum capacitor. When powered up, there should be about 3.3 volts across it.

To build off of what I replied to one of your earlier posts, try removing the capacitor and powering the device up. Decoupling capacitors might not be required for it to function. Replace it with any moderate capacitance cap if it still doesn't work.

It might be a failed component causing a short. I've noticed that switching regulators can make a squeaking noise when they are being overloaded, causing the switching frequency to drop to audible ranges, and becoming sound through piezoelectric effects of capacitors.

Here are images from my known good Zoom H1: Closeup of cap Zoom H1 known good

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you so much! So now I know why I was confused about why a diode would be there. :) \$\endgroup\$ Oct 13, 2020 at 2:33
  • \$\begingroup\$ By any chance, you know what kind of electronic I could get it from? If not, do you think an SMD capacitor would work? \$\endgroup\$ Oct 13, 2020 at 3:02
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    \$\begingroup\$ I think the exact value for this component is pretty flexible. Any larger capacitance SMD capacitor should do the trick. Try different ones if it doesn't work. Though I recommend just taking the broken cap off and try powering on without any component there, as it might not be critical for operation. \$\endgroup\$
    – crossroad
    Oct 13, 2020 at 3:23
  • \$\begingroup\$ I tried powering it on without it and it didn't work because it probably has to do with the toggle on/off circuit. So I'm going to go with SMD and see if it works. \$\endgroup\$ Oct 13, 2020 at 3:39
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    \$\begingroup\$ @LoganS.Colon While that may be the (only?) visible damaged component on the board, something caused it to pop. It's likely that there are more damaged components than just that cap... \$\endgroup\$
    – Ron Beyer
    Oct 13, 2020 at 11:28

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