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I am looking for a DC/DC converter from 24V to 5V for powering 2 devices

So this is what I got:

  • A vehicle power box that will give off 24V -- This is my power supply

  • A Raspberry Pi 4 Model B (Max USB draw = 1.2 A)

  • A router ADVANTECH ICR-1601G (The original power supply outputs 5V 2A)

If anyone has any recommendations and/or solutions for use in a vehicle, it would be much appreciated. Currently, I'm thinking that a DC/DC converter would be the easiest solution, but I've not found something that gives off enough current.

Thanks!

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There are any number of 5V@4A DC-DC converters on the market. I searched for "4a DC DC converter" and there were many possibilities.

You could also use a linear 5V 5A regulator but with a 24V input you'll have to have a heat sink to handle the power dissipated.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks for the input! :) \$\endgroup\$ – Aleksander Eriksen Oct 16 '20 at 7:09
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I've an application for which I use a Meanwell PSD-15B-05 to power a Pi 3B+. I note that the Pi 4 has a 3A supply recommended, which is in line with what the datasheet claims a PSD-15B is good for. I doubt normal use of a Pi would see a continuous 3A draw - it doesn't in my case, but I don't know if one supply would run two Pis..

No affiliation to Meanwell; just reporting my direct experience of running a Pi from a DC-DC converter, off a 24v desktop power supply that also was used for switching control/relays external to the Pi. If you need your Pi to sense and switch 24v too, a Pimoroni AutomationHat can make a lot of sense, though I used separate optocouplers and relay boards in my application

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks! I've been looking into the Meanwell PSD-15B-05, and it may work out just fine. But for connecting two outputs, It doesn't look like it will output enough current if the Pi is at max draw. However, It looks like this PYBE30-Q24-S5-T will output enough current if the draw is at max for both devices. \$\endgroup\$ – Aleksander Eriksen Oct 16 '20 at 7:13
  • \$\begingroup\$ Well.. I suppose no-one has a gun to your head insisting you use only one PSU.. They aren't so expensive that you couldn't use two. Also, why not bench test how much juice your Pi4 draws at its max? I've no idea what one has to do with a Pi to make it constantly draw 3A.. mine bitcoin? \$\endgroup\$ – Caius Jard Oct 16 '20 at 13:38
  • \$\begingroup\$ Haha, well you got a point. The Pi would definitely not draw max current anyway. The reason I've only got one supply is that it will be mounted in a vehicle, and I will only get access to two wires (+/-) 24VDC. (This is basically a project where I'm testing some sensors in a vehicle) \$\endgroup\$ – Aleksander Eriksen Oct 23 '20 at 8:29
  • \$\begingroup\$ Is the concern that the supply wires you have wouldn't carry enough current to power two PSU in parallel? Is a single PSU solution sufficiently more efficient that the current it draws is within the limits for the supply wires while being capable of running the Pis? \$\endgroup\$ – Caius Jard Oct 23 '20 at 8:31
  • \$\begingroup\$ Also, I'm sure it's a typo, but if your supply wires are +24v and -24v it could be a problem.. \$\endgroup\$ – Caius Jard Oct 23 '20 at 8:39

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