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It has been more than 10 years, I left electronics. I saw this circuit of wireless power transfer, it has to do with induction, but the oscillator circuit shown doesn't contain a capacitor. can anyone explain to me how this will work?

enter image description here

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    \$\begingroup\$ Looks like a blocking oscillator (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blocking_oscillator)... \$\endgroup\$ – Circuit fantasist Oct 25 at 14:30
  • \$\begingroup\$ Self-capacitance probably. \$\endgroup\$ – Brian Drummond Oct 25 at 15:05
  • \$\begingroup\$ It's a typical "joule thief" design with an added secondary. I think I've described how that works more than once here, but this is the more recent attempt. However, I'm not sure in this case about coil's reversal and the impact on the BJT. \$\endgroup\$ – jonk Oct 25 at 15:14
  • \$\begingroup\$ This question has been asked before: electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/519662/… \$\endgroup\$ – Lars Hankeln Oct 25 at 16:11
  • \$\begingroup\$ doesn't contain a capacitor There is ALWAYS some capacitance present, for example the junctions of the NPN have a small capacitance between them. But this circuit doesn't need any capacitance to resonate. \$\endgroup\$ – Bimpelrekkie Oct 25 at 17:00

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