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I am trying to figure out the supply voltage for an 12V induction probe. The probe requires 12v and the supply could either be 12 or 24v. Currently, I have a SPDT switch to manually choose the supply voltage. When the switch is set to 24v the output goes through a 12v voltage regulator and when the switch is set to 12v it just passes through. I was thinking a buck-boost convertor would work, but space is limited. I am looking at using a low-side transistor switch as a possible solution, but I am not sure.

Probe LJ18A3-8-Z/BX http://www.zyltech.com/18mm-proximity-sensor-lj18a3-8-z-bx/

The probe's description says it supports DC 6-36V, but I have found that I get the most consistent measurements at 12v.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ According to this it's likely that your choice of regulator may offer pass-through, thus simplifying the design. \$\endgroup\$ – nanofarad Oct 26 at 16:17
  • \$\begingroup\$ How about a link to the probe's data sheet? \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka Oct 26 at 16:41
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That's a proximity sensor, not a "probe".

Unfortunately there is no datasheet in the link you provided - just a basic specification so it may not be a good choice.

The probe's description says it supports DC 6 - 36 V, but I have found that I get the most consistent measurements at 12 V.

This may be true although it is unlikely. The sensor will (on a good one) regulate the voltage internally so that the sensitivity is independent of supply voltage.

I am looking at using a low-side transistor switch as a possible solution, but I am not sure.

A low-side transistor switch is not a voltage regulator. It's a switch.

Check your hunch about voltage sensitivity by mounting it in a way that you can make repeatable measurements. Be aware that their recommended method of operation is to have the target move across the face rather than towards the face. Edit your measurements into your question.

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