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I am trying to replace the keyboard on my 2019 Samsung Notebook 9 Pro. I had to pull off a layer of black tape on the old one to get it out. The tape was glued to the bottom of the keyboard, right above the motherboard. It ripped a little bit as I pulled it off and I can see that it looks metallic on the adhesive side.

What is this? An electrical insulator? Heat conductor? Do I need to replace it, and if so with what? I attached pictures of the old keyboard in process of trying to remove the tape, and the new one without the tape.

Pictures: https://imgur.com/a/VJHTdP3

Edit: Here is a rough outline of where the layer was glued down. There were two pieces, the one on bottom is almost entirely pulled off in the pic, while the top one remains intact and glued to the keyboard.

Here is a picture of the keyboard area with the tape still applied, pulled from a parts supplier website: https://www.impactcomputers.com/image/cache/data/products/2/974577-800x800.jpg

My Pictures of Old and New Keyboard:

Old Keyboard In Laptop

New Keyboard Without Tape

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    \$\begingroup\$ From your pictures it looks like the new keyboard has the same insulation. You should carefully remove any old insulation which has stuck to the machine. Have you looked for any video tutorials on the internet? They are often useful. \$\endgroup\$ – Raffles Oct 26 at 19:58
  • \$\begingroup\$ On the top picture I have already removed most of it, and it fell apart in the process. You can see at the top there are several screws covered that are not covered on the new keyboard. Originally, the old keyboard had the black covering almost all of the screws. \$\endgroup\$ – sddaa Oct 26 at 20:25
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It could be

  • an ESD shield, to prevent electrostatic (dis)charge to/from fingers, and/or
  • an EMI shield to prevent RF radiation ingress or egress through the gaps between keys or through non-conductive keys, per FCC rules.

In that case, small rips are ok, but all of it must be conductively interconnected. Of course, best to replace the whole thing.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Wouldn't a shielding like that cover the whole keyboard? This one only covered parts of it, maybe 50 percent total area across two "stickers." \$\endgroup\$ – sddaa Oct 26 at 21:35
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    \$\begingroup\$ @jdd maybe we are not looking at the same thing... can you edit the pic and outline what exactly you mean? Metallic tape or metallic adhesive foil can serve that shielding purpose, to cover areas left open by other shielding measures. \$\endgroup\$ – P2000 Oct 26 at 22:42
  • \$\begingroup\$ Here is a rough outline of where the layer was glued down. There were two pieces, the one on bottom is almost entirely pulled off in the pic, while the top one remains intact and glued to the keyboard. \$\endgroup\$ – sddaa Oct 27 at 18:30
  • \$\begingroup\$ Here is a picture of the keyboard area with the tape still applied, pulled from a parts supplier website: impactcomputers.com/image/cache/data/products/2/… \$\endgroup\$ – sddaa Oct 27 at 20:05
  • \$\begingroup\$ @jdd ok thanks for the pics, yes, that's covering part of the whole board but the rest seems to be encased in metal which serves the same shielding purpose, and so does not need shielding tape/foil. Good luck wth the repair! (Luck is good...) \$\endgroup\$ – P2000 Oct 27 at 20:16
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Without seeing the machine and new keyboard with my own eyes, I would say that a new keyboard should be ready to install as is, provided you remove the old one and all its connectors correctly. You should see if thermal paste has been applied anywhere, but I doubt if this would be on the keyboard. Without explicit instructions, you should use your best judgement to make sure that you note all the connectors and screws (take pictures if necessary) and if you believe there is a possibility of a short circuit with the component that covers the backing material, for instance previously protected by the insulation that you removed, you should try to obtain similar insulation, be it electrical or thermal, and replace it.

Edit, following your edit, : use your logic and intuition, unless you prefer to play it safe and take it to a repair station. If you can identify parts that will obviously cause a short circuit or friction that should be protected, go ahead and protect them. Ask your local supply store if they have the same material. They will be happy to supply the material to you. I've changed keyboards and none of them required any supplementary insulation, but obviously this cannot be guaranteed as gospel for all machines.

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