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I have revised this posting on the off chance that someone else in the future is interested in what I discovered.

TL;DR: I plannned to use an AX159060 wiper motor in an automotive project, but found that the "park" switch appears to be normally open, not the typical normally closed. The (AE)159300 motor is nearly identical to the AX159060 motor, but the park is of the typical normally closed style.

Background: I originally planned to use an AX159060 wiper motor in my project to modernize the windshield wipers on a 1970s Datsun. It appeared to be a convenient form factor, and was relatively common. However, in my testing, I found that the parking feature worked unusually and decided that a different motor would suit my needs better. The motor I decided to replace it with was an (AE)159300 whose internal switching is arranged better for my application. In my searching, I found a schematic for both the AX159060 and (AE)159300 motors which I have attached below for anyone interested.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Ww5-pmiokc

AX159060 used in 2008-2015 Cadillac CTS and 2007-2010 GM trucks. My motor followed the "W/O DENSO" path and never connected Pin 3 and Pin 5 under any circumstance. Schematic: https://www.silveradosierra.com/electrical/2010-1500-windshield-wiper-motor-wiring-t239857.html enter image description here

(AE)159300 used in 2006-2018 Toyota RAV4, 2008-2014 Subaru Impreza, and MANY more. Schematic Page 186: https://frankensteinmotorworks.com/2GRFE/diagrams/Toyota%20RAV4%20Electrical%20Wiring%20Diagrams%20%28EWD%29.pdf

enter image description here

These two wiper motors appear to share a common manufacturer, however I have no proof of this. My hunch is that Toyota makes these motors and then sells them to other companies with unique part numbers according to the application.

I find the Toyota wiper motor to be a convenient form factor, and seems like an ideal choice for design projects or to upgrade from a NLA part.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ What is a "cutsheet?" \$\endgroup\$
    – JRE
    Nov 5 '20 at 13:08
  • \$\begingroup\$ Technical data sheet or other product documentation. \$\endgroup\$
    – Chris
    Nov 5 '20 at 20:20
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A SPST switch may be used when the motor is controlled by an Electronic Control Unit (ECU) with two relays - one for Hi/Low and the other for Run/Brake. The SPST switch is read by the controlling Microprocessor. It is possible for the park position to be adjusted - if the Park switch actuates slightly earlier in the sweep, then the micro-controller can delay the brake actuation for a certain time (10s-100s of ms) to optimize the parking position. This time can be programmed for each individual car to take account of mechanical variation and installation tolerances.

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A double pole, 3 position, rotary switch is to be used to control the 2-speed, self-parking wiper motor.

enter image description here

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  • \$\begingroup\$ @jsotola, Thank you very much for pointing it out. The error has been rectified. I regret the oversight. \$\endgroup\$
    – vu2nan
    Nov 5 '20 at 19:30
  • \$\begingroup\$ I have modified your drawing to explain how the internal wiring and switching appears to be wired. What you attached seems to be standard, and is how I expected this motor to be wired as well. \$\endgroup\$
    – Chris
    Nov 5 '20 at 20:37
  • \$\begingroup\$ Just an 'NO' contact, actuated only in the parked position, would serve no purpose. \$\endgroup\$
    – vu2nan
    Nov 6 '20 at 3:27
  • \$\begingroup\$ I agree, it seems almost worthless. But I have checked and rechecked the motor, and that is how it was built. I am stuck because it seems to be a perfect motor for my application besides this strange park switch. I am hoping there is some way I can make it work regardless, which is why I asked. Thank you for looking into it. \$\endgroup\$
    – Chris
    Nov 6 '20 at 4:47
  • \$\begingroup\$ Anytime, Chris! \$\endgroup\$
    – vu2nan
    Nov 6 '20 at 5:04

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