0
\$\begingroup\$

How is the time constant for an LR circuit is determined in the case of charging, where one resistor is connected in parallel and another resistor is connected series to an inductor. enter image description here

\$\endgroup\$
4
  • \$\begingroup\$ Show the circuit you have in mind, because it depends on where the parallel resistor is located (in parallel with the source or in parallel with the inductor). If it is the latter, then Andy’s answer below is what you want. \$\endgroup\$ – relayman357 Nov 15 '20 at 17:43
  • \$\begingroup\$ Sir i have added it please check now \$\endgroup\$ – Sudharsan Nov 15 '20 at 19:04
  • \$\begingroup\$ Please check now \$\endgroup\$ – Sudharsan Nov 15 '20 at 19:05
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks for adding the picture. It is clear now, see my answer. \$\endgroup\$ – relayman357 Nov 15 '20 at 19:28
0
\$\begingroup\$

Since your upper resistor is in parallel with the ideal voltage source, it will not be part of the time constant for the inductor transient. You can ignore it as if it’s not even there.

\$\endgroup\$
4
  • \$\begingroup\$ Sir why we are neglecting the above resistance? \$\endgroup\$ – Sudharsan Nov 15 '20 at 19:48
  • \$\begingroup\$ But what u have said is the same on my book solution \$\endgroup\$ – Sudharsan Nov 15 '20 at 19:49
  • \$\begingroup\$ Sir.... please post an image of what circuit mr. Andy has explained.... iam confused with that \$\endgroup\$ – Sudharsan Nov 15 '20 at 19:50
  • \$\begingroup\$ You are welcome. Andy (I think) was thinking your upper resistor was in parallel with just the inductor. \$\endgroup\$ – relayman357 Nov 15 '20 at 20:15

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.