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I have those cheap 60w chinese soldering iron that runs on 220/240v ac here. Any time I try to solder some ICs it burns them. I know that there are temperature controlled irons in the market but those are too expensive here. My objective is to lower its temperature just for soldering and I dont need much of display or any such complexities. I know there are some Arduino based ones and some triac based once but I thought of doing it using dc.
I plan to rectify the mains with rectifiers and then feed it into pwm circuit (I plan in using 555 circuit to make it simple ) and mosfet . I plan to lower the voltage for the pwm cicuit and use the power mosfet in series with soldering iron . Should I go for it ? Will it work ?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat. \$\endgroup\$ – Voltage Spike Nov 19 '20 at 16:07
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My answer is based on this:

I plan to rectify the mains with rectifiers and then feed it into pwm circuit (I plan in using 555 circuit to make it simple ) and mosfet .

This is a circuit I've worked with that is uses a MOSFET to control a high voltage DC motor. You'll have to work out the values of the components based on what you have or can obtain, but this is a starting point for you. There will be several components you won't need such as DC3, D6, and D31, perhaps more.

I suggest being careful you are driving the MOSFET properly. Also, D5 is a flyback diode and will be critical in protecting the MOSFET from damage. High voltage DC like this is dangerous so please be careful. If you are new to circuit design, I'd suggest going with the lighting dimmer switch idea others have suggested.

Here's a start

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60W is a lot for soldering electronics. I have not used an uncontrolled iron in years, but I think more like 30-40W is appropriate.

You could try wiring a 1N4006 1A rectifier in series with the iron, which will reduce the power to half. That will only cost you pennies.

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