0
\$\begingroup\$

I've been doing a lot of research into linear actuators, and have come up pretty much empty handed in finding any small sized (lifting force 10-30 newtons) linear actuators for a doable price (30-50 dollars). I've seen some diy rack and pinion designs, and while prototyping I ended up turning a servo into a linear actuator with a lift arm, but I'm not much of a machinist, and would much rather a all in one solution.

So does anyone know of anywhere that sells 30-50 dollar linear actuators? Or will I always need to make them myself?

\$\endgroup\$

closed as off-topic by Matt Young, RedGrittyBrick, Daniel Grillo, Chetan Bhargava, Nick Alexeev Jan 15 '14 at 17:07

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • \$\begingroup\$ This is a mechanical engineering question, without much of electrical engineering aspect, which this site is about. Also, it is a request for a shopping recommendation, and those are frowned upon here, unfortunately. I'm sure some of us are tempted to answer it, nevertheless! \$\endgroup\$ – Anindo Ghosh Jan 9 '13 at 7:30
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ DIY can be easyish depending on required lifetime. Nut on a thread can give you a reasonable reduction ratio.Worm drive to gear gives you N:1 for an N tooth gear and a 1-start worm (which almost all will be). \$\endgroup\$ – Russell McMahon Jan 9 '13 at 15:05
3
\$\begingroup\$

DIY can be easyish depending on required lifetime.

(1) Nut on a thread can give you a reasonable reduction ratio.
If this is for one off or a few and depending on size then battery-drill motor plus gearboxes driving a threaded rod may work for you. [I'm lifting ~= 100 kg using these so your 30 N figures is easily met :-). Battery powered screw drivers can also be used. As a screwdriver is usually of lower gearing you could use a linear linkage from a "con rod" directly off a driven wheel of desired size to get the travel you need.

An example

Ha ha / Wow Pet feeder linear actuatoir using a RC servo

Instructables RC servo based - low speed linear feed- OK for ideqas.

(2) Worm drive to gear gives you N:1 for an N tooth gear and a 1-start worm (which almost all will be). Driven gear to "con rod" gives linear output.

\$\endgroup\$
4
\$\begingroup\$

Search for "door lock actuator". If you don't mind closing your own control loops externally (current/position), then automotive power door lock linear actuators are a great way to get a compact linear actuator at a low price (provided that you don't need much mechanical reduction)

enter image description here

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Just ordered a few in to play with, thanks for the suggestion :) \$\endgroup\$ – Ben Jan 10 '13 at 0:28
2
\$\begingroup\$

You don't give much in the way of specs beyond force, but I suggest peeking at Firgelli Technologies. They're not quite in your price range, but not all that far off, and they can be ordered with a few different control interfaces. It feels like a fair price.

\$\endgroup\$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.