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What is the difference between these parts? The datasheet shows completely different pinnings, but both are specified over the same range and both have the A, B and ungraded specifications for tolerance.

Just curious.

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From the datasheet:

The TL432 has exactly the same functionality and electrical specifications as the TL431, but has different pinouts for the DBV, DBZ, and PK packages.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Hmm interesting. Why would TI produce different pinned versions? Is it to ease routing on crowded PCBs? \$\endgroup\$
    – Thomas O
    Oct 18, 2010 at 21:44
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    \$\begingroup\$ I guess? Or maybe for compatibility with competing parts? \$\endgroup\$
    – endolith
    Oct 18, 2010 at 23:40
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    \$\begingroup\$ They probably redesigned the die, which caused the pin connections to move about. \$\endgroup\$ Oct 19, 2010 at 6:56
  • \$\begingroup\$ I suppose they probably redesigned the die to reduce costs and/or increase yield, but couldn't make it pin-compatible. Maybe the TL432 is cheaper than the TL431. \$\endgroup\$
    – Thomas O
    Oct 19, 2010 at 11:49
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    \$\begingroup\$ I should have said "isolated switchers", to be exact. Lots and lots of isolated switchers use a TL431 on the secondary side. Its output is transferred to the primary side via an optocoupler. This app'note shows a step-by-step explanation how the TL431 replaces the reference/feedback circuit of a switcher IC: national.com/an/AN/AN-1095.pdf Not that I think it's a particularly elegant solution, but it shows the general idea. \$\endgroup\$
    – zebonaut
    Jul 25, 2011 at 20:25

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