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The clearest image I could manage.

I am replacing the paper and wax capacitors in a tube radio of 1949 vintage. Puzzled by the initials P.V. where I'd expect to read VAC or VDC. Can anyone explain this puzzling jargon?

For some reason that's beyond me, this was by far the clearest image I could capture of the elusive thing.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Could it be Peak Voltage? \$\endgroup\$ – Peter Bennett Dec 9 '20 at 23:41
  • \$\begingroup\$ That would make a clear distinction from the other capacitors which are marked DCVW which I take to signify working DC voltage. Thank you. \$\endgroup\$ – Simon Owen Dec 10 '20 at 1:34
  • \$\begingroup\$ Scanning the small print in this advertisement suggests Peak Voltage is right: messui.polygonal-moogle.com/valves/VR199401.pdf#page=9 The article also mentions that "the label on some filter capacitors gives a peak or surge rating ..." on page 10. \$\endgroup\$ – ocrdu Dec 10 '20 at 2:36
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    \$\begingroup\$ I've been a keen reader here -a lurker perhaps - for the entire time I have been pursuing my interest in electronics (about 18 months). No amount of self-guided study can hold a match to the wisdom of those with greater experience. If only I'd figured that out 30 years ago! \$\endgroup\$ – Simon Owen Dec 10 '20 at 4:36

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