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I found this symbol in one of my control circuits. It is a part of a suction valve operated by a motor overload relay.

I have been pulling my hair out trying to find the meaning of this symbol and searched for this on Google and every possible forum, but with no luck. I am absolutely certain that this must be some silly symbol which I am unaware of and perhaps be well known.

enter image description here

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Some context would be nice so that we could see if this appears in other parts of the schematic or what symbol set the author has used.

In the absence of that it appears to be a normally closed contact. The 'V' on the contact might have a special meaning but without anything else to go on it's not possible to say.

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Typically this is used by switches that have "automatic returns", the "V" denotes an automatic reset.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Can't find it in the IEEE standard. It's not 4.2.1.2 Fixed contact with momentary contact (automatic return). \$\endgroup\$ – mins Dec 26 '20 at 20:30
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    \$\begingroup\$ That's the great thing about standards, there are so many to choose from, including your own. I'm just speaking from experience working with industrial schematics for 20 years... It should be drawn without the circles and with the triangle on the line side if you want the standardized version. \$\endgroup\$ – Ron Beyer Dec 26 '20 at 22:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ You should be right Ron, this is really a weird combination: Filled triangle usually meaning 'automatic return' and empty circle usually meaning 'no automatic return'. To me an empty thin triangle is associated with the 'limit' function, but is not at the end. I wonder which symbol library contains this one. \$\endgroup\$ – mins Dec 27 '20 at 16:25
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Per IEEE STD 315 section 4.2.1.1 a fixed contact can be represented as a circle.

Per IEEE STD 315 section 4.2.1.2 a fixed contact with momentary contact (automatic return) is represented using a triangle.

The symbol you have appears to have a fixed contact (circle) combined with a triangle on the moving part (meaning a momentary contact).

Therefore this symbol is probably an ordinary momentary switch.

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