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The above question I solved it as follows:

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But, I noticed the following:

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Is there a different method to solve this question?

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    \$\begingroup\$ I don't see that any of the four answers are correct. Using Millman's theorem I get 23.377 volts. Yes, there is no answer given that is correct. \$\endgroup\$
    – Andy aka
    Jan 8 at 14:01
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None of the four stated answers are correct. Using Millman's theorem, the voltage between A and B is 23.377 volts. If you ignore the 2 Ω resistor (i.e. consider it to be open circuit) then the answer is 38.298 volts and this matches one of the four given answers.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Thanks alot. great explanation \$\endgroup\$
    – OMAR
    Jan 8 at 20:49
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Yes, there are different methods to solve this problem.

You could use source transformation to convert the voltage sources with series resistors into current sources with parallel resistors, then use the node voltage method to solve. Although the circuit might become trivial once you do those conversions...

You could also use superposition. Find the contribution from each source and add them up.

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If you select point \$ A\$ as the reference node/ground, it enables you to write one node voltage equation with one unknown.

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I can start you off on the equation. $$\frac{V_B-(-50\text{V})}{5\Omega}+...= $$

Note, however, that none of the answers will match the result you get, as Andy has already stated.

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