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I am working with some polymers that behave like semiconductors when they are plugged into the current.

I am calculating the mobility of these polymers and I need the value of the current density (J) in order to achieve it.

I have found that the current density is the sum of the Jp+Jn.

Therefore, since for an intrinsic semiconductor the number of n and p is the same, then for Jp should I divide the total J by 2 or does this only apply to inorganic semiconductors?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ It's really hard to understand your question. Please edit it and make it grammatically correct. The title "do electrons and holes are equally" is nonsense. \$\endgroup\$
    – jwh20
    Feb 11 at 14:39
  • \$\begingroup\$ Try physics stack exchange. \$\endgroup\$
    – Andy aka
    Feb 11 at 14:39
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In an intrinsic semiconductor the electron and hole concentration are equal. But you almost certainly don't have an intrinsic semiconductor.

Semiconductors are sensitive to impurity concentrations on the order of parts per billion or parts per trillion. It is very difficult, and therefore very expensive, to approach a true intrinsic semiconductor. Polymers that behave like semiconductors sound to me like they are likely going to have unavoidable impurities or dangling bonds that change the carrier concentrations.

then for Jp should I divide the total J by 2 or does this only apply to inorganic semiconductors?

This doesn't apply for any semiconductor. The mobility of the electrons and holes will be different, which you can't figure out as easily as you propose. I believe Hall measurements are a common method for measuring mobility.

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