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OLED and AMOLED screen unit is pixel that made by three main LED colour. They are RED, GREEN, and BLUE.

For other color, like YELLOW it combined from RED and GREEN. But, is it really combined? I mean it combined by special glass that each emitting light through it then combine them and create new light (yellow) .

Or, every LED directly emitted to our eyes without through that special glass? If it directly, then how can our eyes detect it as yellow while in nano scale we see it as RED and GREEN are turning ON?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Have you ever looked very closely at an LED display? Like at the pixels through a loupe or magnifying glass? \$\endgroup\$
    – Ron Beyer
    Feb 13, 2021 at 1:39
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Ron Beyer not yet \$\endgroup\$ Feb 13, 2021 at 1:40
  • \$\begingroup\$ @MuhammadIkhwanPerwira Because of human biology, we can't tell the right mix of green and blue from certain yellows: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cone_cell \$\endgroup\$ Feb 13, 2021 at 1:44
  • \$\begingroup\$ This is not just LEDs, but pretty much every color screen technology. You might want to read more on en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Primary_color \$\endgroup\$ Feb 13, 2021 at 1:47
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yellow is mix of red and green (additive method), not blue and green. \$\endgroup\$
    – AJN
    Feb 13, 2021 at 9:01

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For other color, like YELLOW it combined from RED and GREEN. But, is it really combined? I mean it combined by special glass that each emitting light through it then combine them and create new light (yellow) .

Assuming the subpixels in the display are too small to resolve by eye (meaning that you cannot see them), then actually they are combined by the lens of your eye and only form yellow as they hit your retina.

If you have a very low resolution display and look closely, you will see the individual colors. In this case, they're large enough that your eye can resolve them, so they do not mix to form secondary colors such as yellow.

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    \$\begingroup\$ combined by the lens of your eye and only form yellow as they hit your retina ... they form yellow in your brain ... the retina still detects separate red and green \$\endgroup\$
    – jsotola
    Feb 13, 2021 at 2:29
  • \$\begingroup\$ @jsotola Secondary colors are processed by local retinal neurons, so in either sense primary colors are combined in the retina. However, I don't think the OP is asking about color processing, but rather where the actual light fields combine (although by chance both happen at the same place). \$\endgroup\$ Feb 13, 2021 at 3:31

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