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how is the zero sequence component is balanced while the three vectors are inphase and not displaced from each other by 120°?

Isn't the definition of a balanced system is one in which the magnitudes of all phases are equal and are spaced out by 120°?

The confusion came from the book below: enter image description here

The source: Electrical Power Systems By C L WADHWA 2012 by New Academic Science Limited ISBN : 978 1 906574 39 0

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  • \$\begingroup\$ It's using a different meaning of "balanced", I suppose \$\endgroup\$ – user253751 Feb 18 at 9:28
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    \$\begingroup\$ "Equi-spaced" does not necessarily mean that the angle is strictly greater than zero, it can be zero. It means that the differences between them are equal. So the assertion is true: they are the same magnitude, and same angle, which means they are equi-spaced at zero degrees difference between them. \$\endgroup\$ – a concerned citizen Feb 18 at 10:00
  • \$\begingroup\$ @a concerned citizen please make a formal answer. \$\endgroup\$ – OMAR Feb 18 at 10:58
  • \$\begingroup\$ @OMAR When using the ping operator, @, use TAB to cycle between the names and make sure that there are no spaces. "a concerned citizen" should appear "aconcernedcitizen". Otherwise there are no notifications. \$\endgroup\$ – a concerned citizen Feb 18 at 22:10
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"Equi-spaced" does not necessarily mean that the angle is strictly greater than zero, it can be zero. It means that the differences between them are equal. So the assertion is true: they are the same magnitude and the same angle, which means they are equi-spaced at zero degrees difference between them.

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