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I tried soldering cables to the female XT60 connector but no matter what I did, my solder did not stick to the metal part of the connector. I had no problem with the cables though. Any idea about what I might be doing wrong? Tip of the soldering iron

My solder. It doesn't say anything on it and I remember that it's a pretty cheap

Soldering iron

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    \$\begingroup\$ Did you use flux? \$\endgroup\$ – Dzarda Mar 5 at 15:59
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Dzarda Yes I did \$\endgroup\$ – Yağız Alp Ersoy Mar 5 at 16:03
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    \$\begingroup\$ Probably your iron cannot heat the pin enough enough, or perhaps the connector has a coating that is not made for soldering, like crimping. \$\endgroup\$ – Damien Mar 5 at 16:13
  • \$\begingroup\$ 30W probably isn't enough power to heat the XT60 connector pin. \$\endgroup\$ – user_1818839 Mar 5 at 16:54
  • \$\begingroup\$ To be honest, I am confused @BrianDrummond because Marcus Müller doesn't say that. Can you elaborate please? \$\endgroup\$ – Yağız Alp Ersoy Mar 5 at 17:02
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The tip of your soldering iron looks like it doesn't "wet" well, i.e. it solder doesn't adhere to it, which means there's little heat transfer between the iron and the solder, and soldering won't work.

Soldering thick wires/connectors requires higher powered soldering irons, with a good tip.

Considering the red tape probably also hides a defect, this iron has a screw that doesn't even fit and and the tip looks abused:
Buy a new soldering iron that's less terrible. Doesn't need to be great. This works reasonably well for the occasional solderer.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you so much for the advice and I have a question: Can this problem be evaded with just changing the tip? If so, I have one lying around, it's very clean but it doesn't fit into this soldering iron. I want to buy it from the internet but I am worried that the one I'll buy won't fit too. Is there a standard? How can I measure it? Answer these questions and I'll accept your answer right away :) \$\endgroup\$ – Yağız Alp Ersoy Mar 5 at 16:58
  • \$\begingroup\$ I wouldn't have given the answer I gave if I thought the iron you had was worth salvaging, sorry. \$\endgroup\$ – Marcus Müller Mar 5 at 17:33
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There is a metallurgy issue with soldering to nickel plated surfaces and depending upon the thickness of the final tin/lead coating, the steam aging will penetrate the finish coating and create a problem with the adhesion of the final coating.

You don’t mention what type of flux is being used, but this is one place where an aggressive flux can be used to remove the passivation from the nickel coating. I would suggest a strong OAH1 FLUX or the more acidic plumbers flux for this only then clean well with Isoprop.

Get the tip glossy with solder and apply a thin coat of hot solder to each surface before mating.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Yep, sounds like a nickel contact that should be crimped. Agressive flux will work when soldering to nickel plating, but it has to be cleaned exceptionally well. You need to soak in isopropanol or other suitable flux cleaners, and even then I would not be suppriced if corrosion occurs. The flux will wisker up the cable, and into every notch and crack. I would just not solder these and get a tin plated connector instead. \$\endgroup\$ – Arcatus Mar 5 at 21:02
  • \$\begingroup\$ Adding baking soda to the isoprop mix might neutralize the acid flux. \$\endgroup\$ – Tony Stewart EE75 Mar 5 at 22:42

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