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Please have a look at the following picture and tell me what I am not seeing properly.

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This is a core type transformer. However, I don't quite understand "One-half low voltage winding and one-half high voltage winding". Does this simply mean primary and secondary windings? Which means that there is one primary and secondary winding on left leg of the core and one primary and secondary on right limb?

Thank you very much for assistance.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Primary and secondary windings are split into two coils (left and right) for better core saturation. But it is just one primary and one secondary. \$\endgroup\$ – Michal Podmanický Mar 6 at 18:45
  • \$\begingroup\$ @MichalPodmanický You mean coupling, not saturation. \$\endgroup\$ – winny Mar 6 at 22:17
  • \$\begingroup\$ @winny Yes, the coupling is better expression. I'm not english, sry. \$\endgroup\$ – Michal Podmanický Mar 6 at 22:52
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You understand it correctly. Whether low voltage or high voltage winding is primary or not depends on what type of transformer it is, whether step up or step down. And ofcourse the one half of the windings imply numerous turns of coil that are in series with the other half on the second limb.

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Yes. They the primary and secondary are split into two halves. They have the exact the same amount of turns and usually parallel connected. In contrast to text book, these wingdings are not separated, each one on its limb.

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If all the primary was on one leg and all the secondary was on the other leg, it would still be a transformer, with the same turns ratio, and (at least with a high impedance load) the same voltage ratio.

And the inter-winding capacitance would be much lower, which may be an advantage in some applications.

However the leakage inductance would be much higher so for most applications it would be much less efficient than the much more tightly coupled winding scheme shown.

Which winding is closer to the core is a design choice : with the low voltage winding closer to the core. For example, the core can safely be grounded, as there are more layers of insulation between core and HV winding, making it easier to meet insulation breakdown requirements without using especially thick insulation.

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