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I was asked to:

Design a combinational logic circuit that has 10 inputs, numbered 0 through to 9, and one output. The output is required to go HIGH whenever any one, or more, of the inputs numbered 2, 5, 6 or 7 go HIGH. The circuit should be free of static hazards.

I know I can use OR of 2,5,6 and 7 and give it's output but I don't know how to check for static hazards and how to remove it? Please help..


This is the circuit , do this circuit has static hazard?

Please check if this circuit has static hazards.

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    \$\begingroup\$ It is not clear what is meant by "free of static hazards" in your question. Is this something that has been discussed in your class? Are you studying TVSS circuits for IO protection from static discharge? \$\endgroup\$ Mar 14 at 16:14
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    \$\begingroup\$ No no this is logic hazards like static 0 or static 1 hazards \$\endgroup\$
    – BornMad
    Mar 14 at 16:15
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There are no static hazards in your circuit because no signal feeds two or more inputs. Put another way, there is only one path, for each input, to the final output.

Not all circuits where there is a signal which feeds two or more inputs, have a static hazard. However, all circuits with static hazards have such signals.

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Do you know how to build the truth table for the 10 inputs? From there move on to the K-map and derive the Boolean expression of the digital circuit.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ The expression is simple and can be predicted from condition , that is OR of 2 , 5 ,6 ,7 . \$\endgroup\$
    – BornMad
    Mar 14 at 16:13
  • \$\begingroup\$ A K-map for 10 input variables is a bit hard to visualize, let alone solve. Better move to more advanced algorithms like Quinn-McCluskey. \$\endgroup\$
    – Bart
    Apr 15 at 10:51

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