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Will the reverse recovery current that both diodes see be the super-position of both diodes' reverse recovery currents?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I am not sure what you mean by "super-position of both diodes' reverse recovery currents". If the diodes are in series, their reverse recovery current will be equal. However, the total charge that needs to be removed from diodes to stop conduction will be (to a first approximation) the sum of the charges in both diodes. \$\endgroup\$ – Math Keeps Me Busy Mar 25 at 3:32
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    \$\begingroup\$ would their reverse recovery times also be equal despite being different types of diodes? \$\endgroup\$ – gorge Mar 25 at 7:07
  • \$\begingroup\$ See @Andyaka 's answer. If the voltage is reversed, if one diode recovers faster than the other, that diode will act as an open circuit, even though the other diode is still conductive. Even though the majority carriers in the conductive diode are not removed by an active current, after some time, they will drift or diffuse or recombine with their counterparts and the slower diode will also become non-conductive, i.e. recover. \$\endgroup\$ – Math Keeps Me Busy Mar 25 at 13:10
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If you have a fast reverse recovery diode in series with a slow reverse recovery diode you will have, in effect, a fast recovery diode. Consider that the slow reverse recovery diode is just a short circuit but, it is still in series with the fast reverse recovery diode.

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