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I was toying with the idea of a project that would involve adding a SATA device to an existing PCIe lane; probably far too ambitious for me, but before I could confirm that I noticed that there aren't any PCIe-SATA bridges available from suppliers like Digikey, Mouser, Element14.

There are PCIe/SATA redrivers & muxes, and PCIe-USB bridges, and USB-SATA bridges, but not PCIe-SATA bridges. Such chips exist (e.g JMB58x) but are not available anywhere that I'm aware of that an individual/someone ordering low volume might be able to use.

Am I misunderstanding some terminology? My best guess was that it's just too specialised/high speed, unavailable because nobody/org that can't 'call for pricing' etc. would be capable of using it anyway - but then surely that would equally apply to redrivers and muxes, and to PCIe-USB bridges for that matter.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ You're looking for a "host bus adapter", not a "bridge", as the accesses aren't transparent. \$\endgroup\$ Mar 29 at 12:33
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SATA is quite an old standard.

NVMe drives are directly connected to the PCI-E bus for speed reasons and do not need any chip to interface them to it.

Perhaps use some NVMe drives instead of SATA and you won't face this issue.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ For this particular case it was to use spinning platter disk I wanted to use, (for price/capacity, already having some) but also interested more generally as e.g. CD/DVD/BD drives still use SATA too. \$\endgroup\$
    – OJFord
    Mar 29 at 11:13
  • \$\begingroup\$ Indeed in that case you might be out of luck. You may be able to implement that in an FPGA with PCI-E & Sata IP, but that would be quite some significant work. Perhaps use a SATA-USB chip instead. You can still find those PCIe-SATA bridges from some shady reseller but might be risky. \$\endgroup\$
    – Damien
    Mar 29 at 11:21

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