0
\$\begingroup\$

Further to a linked answer for Why recommend tantalum over ceramic capacitor for voltage regulator? , we have this:-

resistor

Why is the resistor in the middle a conflict resistor? Should I stop buying un-ethical resistors?


I appreciate that it might just be artistic licence.

\$\endgroup\$
5
  • 12
    \$\begingroup\$ Because it belongs to the Resistance. \$\endgroup\$ Mar 30 at 16:04
  • \$\begingroup\$ Where /what does it say about carbon, metal film or wire/wound metal resisters? \$\endgroup\$ Mar 30 at 16:05
  • \$\begingroup\$ Fighting with resistance is like bumping and grinding with dielectrics. \$\endgroup\$ Mar 30 at 16:06
  • \$\begingroup\$ Should I stop buying un-ethical resistors? - this part is purely opinionated. \$\endgroup\$
    – Eugene Sh.
    Mar 30 at 17:28
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @EugeneSh. Is that your opinion? “Remember that all is but opinion and conceit" -Marcus Aurelius. \$\endgroup\$
    – Paul Uszak
    Mar 30 at 18:08
5
\$\begingroup\$

Most likely, it's just the artist's idea of an "electronic component".

It may be justified by the site where you found the image classifying tin as a conflict mineral.

Tin is used widely for plating the terminals of many types of components, including resistors.

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • \$\begingroup\$ this is my thoughts, to joe-average, a picture of a tant would be a cuboid and wouldn't express anything... while pretty much everyone knows what a leaded resistor looks like (even if the electronics they use do not use leaded resistors). \$\endgroup\$
    – JonRB
    Mar 31 at 9:20
5
\$\begingroup\$

The Congo, Nigeria, Uganda, South Sudan, and many other countries are a pit-full of rich resources and pitiful corruption breeds that profit from these. They rank pretty high on the corruption list but China has invaded many of these areas with massive loans for infrastructure that result in takeover of the assets created after failure to repay.

Stopping purchase of any commodity will not stop the corruption in this food chain for parts that are many tiers down in processing levels from the raw material. You can’t control this or have any impact. What needs to be done will unlikely happen. Wiser countries like NZ, AU and Canada know better. My brother once recovered several million $ from Amin after Idi closed down Canadian mines in Uganda and that occurred while he relayed in Quebec French to his secretary to forward the whereabouts for the Israeli’s raid on the hijacked airplane at Entebbe. His rule when he was VP for Bechtel in Africa, was never take or give a bribe as he wrote infrastructure Master Plans for each country of interest. It was feasible but not practical due to corruption.

\$\endgroup\$
3
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ I'm impressed by your 1st sentence. That's good writing Tony. \$\endgroup\$
    – Paul Uszak
    Mar 30 at 23:26
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ I’m level 1 writer compared to my non-engineering elder brother . He’s was a speech writer for Pierre Trudeau’s Trade & Commerce minister and just wrote a book about the Congo. \$\endgroup\$ Mar 30 at 23:33
  • \$\begingroup\$ "Bien-faire". \$\endgroup\$
    – Paul Uszak
    Mar 30 at 23:36
4
\$\begingroup\$

Tin is used for plating the resistor contact terminals.

Tin plating on the leads or pads of components makes them easier to solder.

Even though the substrate of the resistor is ceramic, the ends of the resistor have a metal coating.

In some special applications, the resistive material itself can also be made of tin or gold alloy.

As common solder types contain tin, most electronic products will have tin in them.

\$\endgroup\$
0
0
\$\begingroup\$

Tantalum capacitors are the component most likely to be made from "conflict minerals": the tantalum comes from coltan ores which come mostly from the war in the Democratic Republic of Congo. That wikipedia page provides a good summary of the conflict.

That, and their tendency to explode when mistreated, has resulted in an effort to provide good replacements that aren't reliant on tantalum.

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.