0
\$\begingroup\$

I'm curious regarding some matters in my experiment session of Efficient Lighting System. There are 4 types of lamps which we measure the data to fill-in the table as in the picture. Correct me if my hypothesis is wrong.

  1. The brighter the lamp, the higher the magnitude of luxes.
  2. Does the higher the neutral current, the more it consumes energy?
  3. CFL does consume more current as it produces brightest light which could be prove based on the lux value in the picture.
  4. Electronic ballast is one type of lamp that can be categorised as energy efficiency because it uses less neutral current but produces higher brightness.

But what indicates the value of real power, reactive power, apparent power and power factor ? What are those powers relatable with this types of lamp? If you have any points to add, please do so.

enter image description here

\$\endgroup\$
6
  • \$\begingroup\$ The brighter the lamp, the higher the magnitude of luxes. Have you read: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lux ? Does the higher the neutral current, the more it consumes energy ? What is meant by "neutral current"? Power consumption = current flowing through lamp * voltage across lamp. So (electrical) current on its own isn't sufficient information. I urge you to do more research into this instead of just asking here. \$\endgroup\$ Apr 16, 2021 at 7:20
  • \$\begingroup\$ I'm sorry. I thought that was relatable. I try to research what those parameters are related to but to no avail. And english wasn't my first language. Is it wrong that the lux is the unit of brightness ? \$\endgroup\$
    – Azim
    Apr 16, 2021 at 7:29
  • \$\begingroup\$ I'm so confused as I needed to make a hypothesis based on the table above in terms of energy efficiency and energy consumption. So what those parameters had to do with this experiment ? \$\endgroup\$
    – Azim
    Apr 16, 2021 at 7:30
  • \$\begingroup\$ You're measuring Lux to 4 significant figures. You're measuring power to one significant figure. The ratios of lux/power look to be all over the place, which is not surprising if that one significant figure of power has +/- a few error. What is switch 1/3? It looks like it might be altering the voltage to your setup, which is unfortunately not recorded. You appear to have a 3 phase supply. Any finite value of neutral current means imbalance, and is usually an error. The only hypothesis you can make is that you need a better experimental design, starting with better recording of input power. \$\endgroup\$
    – Neil_UK
    Apr 16, 2021 at 9:02
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you for the clarification. I'll keep an update \$\endgroup\$
    – Azim
    Apr 16, 2021 at 17:21

2 Answers 2

1
\$\begingroup\$

The brighter the lamp, the higher the magnitude of luxes.

Depends on your definition of "brighter"...

1 lux = 1 lumen / m2

Say you want to light your desk. Same lamp at different distance from desk will produce different lux on your desk. Power decreases with square of distance, so double distance, divide the lux on your desk by 4. And if you put a mirror behind the lamp, or other kind of optics to direct the light, then you can direct more light where it is useful. So you get more lux, but the lamp is still the same.

Does the higher the neutral current, the more it consumes energy ?

That's only valid for resistors, and your lamp is not a resistor.

But what indicates the value of real power, reactive power, apparent power and power factor ?

"Apparent" power means you take the numbers on the ammeter, the numbers on the voltmeter, and you multiply them, so you get something that looks like a power, but it isn't meaningful except to check the rating of breakers and wires. Likewise for current alone.

Read the details.

Active (real) power is the one that counts, and it's what you pay for on the electricity bill. If you want to measure the efficiency of a lamp, or the how much light it puts out per watt of input power, then you have to use real power.

\$\endgroup\$
2
  • \$\begingroup\$ Tips: You can also use HTML entities &Omega;, &mu;, &deg;, &times;, etc. as well as <sup>...</sup> and <sub>...</sub> in the posts (but they don't work in the comments). \$\endgroup\$
    – Transistor
    Apr 16, 2021 at 19:07
  • \$\begingroup\$ Unfortunately I'm too lazy for that, but it seems you can use \$ \rightarrow math \leftarrow \$ in the comments \$\endgroup\$
    – bobflux
    Apr 16, 2021 at 19:57
-1
\$\begingroup\$

A true lux measurement is really hard, especially, while a few light objects is being compared by lux measurement points stability and light object placement much effect the result.

In short, if you want to compare light objects in terms of lux on the floor, you need to form a large grid on the surface and many measurement points on the grid you can not compare the light objects using just one lux measurement.

Light objects has different light patterns it means different light intensities at photometrical angles, if you have chance to measure a goniophotometrical measurement then you see light patterns, total flux, efficiency ( lumen/watt ) then you have information to be able to compare them.

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • \$\begingroup\$ could you take the time an directly answer some of azims questions? \$\endgroup\$
    – Voltage Spike
    Apr 16, 2021 at 17:50

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.