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I have a lead acid battery that is barely above 12 volts (at 12.6) volts. This seemed enough to trip the switch in behavior that changes the 5V pin from output to input in the L298N motor driver module.

The 5V pin which is input now, is necessary for board IC powering.

My big worry is whether the L298N will switch back to output when the voltage eventually drops.

Say I was using the aforementioned battery and the battery suddenly dropped, while at the same time, I was powering the L298N IC with a 5V external power supply. What will happen? I am very worried.

All batteries drop in voltage, so I assumed this would be the case and started looking for suitable regulators, which was fruitless.

I have an idea where I use 6V battery and a step-up converter, is it a more economical and portable choice?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ The L298N doesn't have a 5V output. That means you are using a module with an L298N on it, that also includes other circuitry. Please provide a link to the datasheet of the module you are using. \$\endgroup\$
    – JRE
    Apr 16, 2021 at 14:38
  • \$\begingroup\$ I have edited my question, here is the datasheet. \$\endgroup\$ Apr 16, 2021 at 14:43

1 Answer 1

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The module you are using has an LM7805 5V regulator on board. It will provide 5V as long as the input stays above about 7.5V. Your 12V battery should never drop that low.

You can use the module as planned with your 12V battery without worry.


The 5V output doesn't "switch" depending on the input voltage.

If you supply 12V to the module, it makes 5V using the LM7805.

If you disconnect the 12V input, you can put 5V into the module on the 5V line.

Switching the 5V from output to input is something you must do. It can't do it itself.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ right! I completely forgot that I removed the jumper myself for the output. I am so embarrassed that I had to ask such a question! I was looking around and saw recommendations to remove the jumper when the input voltage is above 12V, a slight over voltage of 0.6V going to do harm to the ICs? \$\endgroup\$ Apr 16, 2021 at 14:55

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