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I've been trying to connect a 2+ meter wire to a nema 17 motor. Usually the motors I buy come with a 1m cable, which is too short for this application. The Nema17 needs a 4 wire connection. So I figured I'd just use a normal 4 conductor 20awg insulated wire and attach a 6-prong jst ph connector on the end which mates with the connector on the stepper I bought.

I am noticing that many stepper motor's external wires are 4 conductors but they are all side by side (like picture below) instead of twisted and insulated together like I am accustomed. Is there a reason for this, or are the manufacturers doing this just because it's cheaper.wire

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    \$\begingroup\$ Convenience. And it does look much neater \$\endgroup\$ – Kartman Apr 17 at 22:24
  • \$\begingroup\$ Purely for coil motion on axis \$\endgroup\$ – Tony Stewart EE75 Apr 18 at 0:11
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Tony Stewart EE75, what you mean by "Purely for coil motion on axis"? \$\endgroup\$ – tlfong01 Apr 18 at 1:07
  • \$\begingroup\$ The flat cable moves axially with the motor in a half coil back and forth \$\endgroup\$ – Tony Stewart EE75 Apr 18 at 1:12
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That's a wire harness standard product.

Cables are crimped and cut by machines and then are manually inserted in the plastic housings by workers.

That's the standard workflow which has the minimum cost for customers.

If you need a twisted wire harness than you need to pay more.


By the way, a twisted cable will reduce EMI radiations especially for stepper motors currents.

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