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I'm trying to design a schematic based off a certain schematic I've seen online. In the image theres two resistors and a capacitor all with a value of 'NP'. What does this mean? I'm guessing it means there is no component but I want to make sure. Should VS be connected to ADCIN at all if this means no component? Also why put a resistor and capacitor symbol in at all then?

enter image description here

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2 Answers 2

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NP = Not Populated.

It's an optional component, presumably for an ADC reference voltage in this circuit. R27 and 28 form a voltage divider. C5 provides some de-coupling / filtering to eliminate VS noise. The three components will be added or not as a group.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ So if I dont intend to add a reference voltage to this pin, I should leave it not connected to anything? \$\endgroup\$ Commented Apr 25, 2021 at 18:23
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    \$\begingroup\$ @sadspaceman yes (although I would double check the datasheet just in case, since not all schematics online are as correct as one might like) \$\endgroup\$
    – BeB00
    Commented Apr 25, 2021 at 18:42
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    \$\begingroup\$ Just for clarification, it means that the space for the component is there, but the component itself isn't, so there's an open circuit (a "gap"), it's not like the component is skipped and the traces on either side directly connected (which would lead to a short-circuit). \$\endgroup\$
    – jcaron
    Commented Apr 26, 2021 at 10:16
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NP means Not Populated. The part is not fitted to the board.

The following abbreviations mean the same:

  NF  for Not Fitted

  DNF for Do Not Fit

NF and DNF are more commonplace, certainly in the UK, Europe and US.

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    \$\begingroup\$ There's also DNP, along the same lines. I've also seen NC. \$\endgroup\$
    – jaskij
    Commented Apr 26, 2021 at 10:34

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