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I'm confused by all the different phases and angles.

Where I live we have a delta generator (3P3W) 230 V system. I was told that the three voltage phases will always be shifted 120° from each other...

... but won't a reactive load in the household shift these? Or I'm mixing up input and output voltage?

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    \$\begingroup\$ The phase angle remains the same, that is dependent on the generator and how it is woundr. It appears you are also mixing in power factor. Spend a bit of time on power factor it should then fall into place. \$\endgroup\$
    – Gil
    Commented May 20, 2021 at 3:43

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The reactive loads connected to the service will cause a phase shift of the current in each phase with respect to that phase's voltage. The phase relationship between voltages of the three phases will not change.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ So the voltage over a load will always be in phase with the input? \$\endgroup\$ Commented May 19, 2021 at 21:13
  • \$\begingroup\$ By input I mean phase/line voltage at the generator. But if the wiring is causing a small phase shift of the voltage, won’t the load also cause it? I have definitely missed something here, but didn’t you also say the only thing shifting was the phase current in respect to its phase voltage? Sorry, this is difficult. \$\endgroup\$ Commented May 19, 2021 at 21:38
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    \$\begingroup\$ @NorwegianClassic Sorry, I hit Enter before proofreading my last comment: the voltages will be in phase at the load with respect to the source, unless we're talking about great distances (where this becomes a transmission line question, which I don't think it is). Currents will shift in phase due to the wire. \$\endgroup\$
    – Theodore
    Commented May 19, 2021 at 21:45

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