1
\$\begingroup\$

I have read the other question on this topic, but having gone through the answer I'm still unsure about the answer to my own, so I hope this is helpful.

If a generator generated 20MWh of electricity in a day (24 hours), then how would I express that in MW?

I want to say the generator was running at XX MW on that particular day. But how would I work out XX if I only had MWhs for the day?

Would I simply divide by 24 (hours in day)?

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Units tend to follow the same logic as the equations used to get them. Thus you can regard MWh as MW * h. Simply divide by 24. \$\endgroup\$
    – Lundin
    May 21, 2021 at 11:39

2 Answers 2

2
\$\begingroup\$

Yes, if you just divide by 24 hours, you'll get the average(!) output power the generator ran at that day. You of course won't be able to tell if it ran at, let's say, 2MW for 10 hours and then 0MW for the other 14 hours, which will also come out to 20MWh.

\$\endgroup\$
2
\$\begingroup\$

The unit Watt (and therefore MW) is a measure of instantaneous power. That can, and often does, vary throughout the time the generator is running.

Energy, especially electrical energy, is often measured in Watt-Hours where 1 WH is 1 Watt of power over a 1 hour period. It could also be 2 Watts over 1/2 hour. WH is simply the power in Watts times the length of time. If the power is constant, then you simply use that constant. If the power varies, you need the average, often calculated by integrating (Calculus!) over the time interval.

So your example of 20 MWh means that the generator produced an AVERAGE of 0.833 MW of power during the 24 hour period.

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.