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Can a short produced from the isolated power supply would rather like to travel to a conductor that is connected to ground, is this a valid statement?

Would a short produced from any kind of isolated power supply would like to travel to ground?

From what I learned, high potential energy will always like to travel to least resistance path to ground.

It also means that the short produced would also like to travel to the user's body and to ground, is this also a correct statement?

If there is no least resistance to ground other than the user's body whos feet is touching ground, this also means the short produced from the isolated power supply would like to travel to the user's body to ground? This is correct, right?

What about arc blasts and arc sparks produced by a short from high voltage and high amperage of AC isolated power supply, such as an isolated transformer, wouldn't these expansive high electron energies of arc blasts and arc sparks would rather like to travel to a nearby conductor that travels to earth ground?

Thanks.

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    \$\begingroup\$ a short doesn't "travel": it's configuration of a circuit. What do you mean with "short" in the context of your question? It doesn't seem to be what the word usually means, and while I've been scratching my head on what you actually mean, it's not clear: current travels, but it doesn't make sufficient sense in the rest of your question, with blasts and sparks and arcs. Electron energies are voltages, but these don't travel, and aren't currents either. I'm afraid you've got too many basic misconceptions for one question here... \$\endgroup\$ May 24, 2021 at 9:33
  • \$\begingroup\$ @ Marcus Muller - Please read what an Arc blast, Arc Spark or Arc flash is (If this is not clear enough, I guess I would have to ask a PhD electrical engineer since what I am asking is too complicated to be comprehended) what is the difference between an arc blast from an isolated power supply and a non isolated power supply?): cableorganizer.com/learning-center/articles/… \$\endgroup\$
    – S To
    May 24, 2021 at 10:01
  • \$\begingroup\$ It's OK; the community, and not your PhD friend (hope he gets paid for this!), are in charge of deciding whether your question is sensible and comprehensible. I for one voted to close it as unclear. \$\endgroup\$ May 24, 2021 at 10:14

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Would a short produced from any kind of isolated power supply would like to travel to ground?

schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

Figure 1. In (a) a L-E fault will cause current to return to the supply through the earth and, if high enough, will blow the fuse. In (b) there is no ground return path, the faulted wire will be neutralised but F2 will not blow.

No. Since there is no other reference to ground no current will flow. Instead the point now connected to ground has been "neutralised".

From what I learned, high potential energy will always like to travel to least resistance path to ground.

No, current will take all paths to ground - not just the path of least resistance. The current through each path will be inversely proportional to its impedance. For current to flow in the first place there must be some other power supply reference to ground - otherwise there is no circuit.

It also means that the short produced would also like to travel to the user's body and to ground, is this also a correct statement?

Only if the user's body completes a circuit.

If there is no least resistance to ground other than the user's body whos feet is touching ground, this also means the short produced from the isolated power supply would like to travel to the user's body to ground? This is correct, right?

No. If there is no circuit then there is no current.

What about arc blasts and arc sparks produced by a short from high voltage and high amperage of AC isolated power supply, such as an isolated transformer, wouldn't these expansive high electron energies of arc blasts and arc sparks would rather like to travel to a nearby conductor that travels to earth ground?

No. If there is no circuit then there is no current.

Regarding "high electron energies", the plasma will have positive and negative ions, both of which are mobile. Don't make the mistake of thinking that all electric current is due to electron mobility.

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"Can a short produced from the isolated power supply would rather like to travel to a conductor that is connected to ground" is this a valid statement?

It is not syntactically correct, so it can't be valid statement.

What you might mean is whether a short from an isolated power can case current to ground? No, in an ideal situation it can't. In practice it could, due to leakage, capacitance, etc. which compromise the isolation.

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No, current doesn't particularly want to travel to ground. If you have an isolated power supply, and connect one terminal to ground, the current flowing will be very small.

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If you have (say) an isolated 25kV supply with two terminals, positive and negative, you could in theory touch either of them and feel nothing. It's only when a path exists from one terminal to the other via your body that you will be fried. Neither of those terminals cares about "ground" - just the other

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