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I came across this line in the installation / operating guidelines of a comfy (blinds) motor:

The drive must not be driven by a solid-state relay or triac relay.

Would there be any technical reason why this shouldn't be allowed? (see installation / operating guidelines)

These blind motors can detect when they are frozen or when there is an obstruction. Thus, when they feel resistance they won't try to move up/down. Could it be that when I connect then to SSR this would interfere with this function?

I currently have it working with 100nF and 100 ohm snubbers over both directions of the motor. (These are 0.5A/230V reversible motors.)

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  • \$\begingroup\$ What's the motor rating in watts or amps? I suspect that an SSR's snubber may give enough leakage to cause trouble. Can you measure the coil resistance? \$\endgroup\$
    – Transistor
    May 24, 2021 at 16:40
  • \$\begingroup\$ There are different versions see technical data. I've measure the current at 0.44A. So it's either the 90 or 120W version. I've measured 1 MOhm from one direction wire to the neutral wire, I doubt that's the coils resistance though, as it seems high to me. \$\endgroup\$ May 25, 2021 at 7:32
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Transistor I've also noticed that if I put the snubbers across the SSRs instead of the motor, the motor will not move. The operation guidelines state: "the voltage of the other direction of rotation may not exceed 55Vrms". Maybe this is part of the reason why SSRs should't be used? \$\endgroup\$ May 27, 2021 at 7:17

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