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In my state (São Paulo, Brazil), theres delta-star transformers that outputs 4-wires. Three phase and one neutral.

I've heard that one of these wires of the triphasic (R,S,T wires) and the neutral wire, outputs 220v, for easy maintening purposes (phase balancing) by the dealership.

Is it true or fake?

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    \$\begingroup\$ In the interest of forestalling you from trying something dangerous, you should look into a transformer that will take a 220V split phase input and provide a 220V single phase output. They're not terribly expensive, especially if your power requirements are sub-kW. \$\endgroup\$
    – vir
    Jun 8 at 19:20
  • \$\begingroup\$ I am still alive. Jajaja. Thanks, I appreciate your answer. \$\endgroup\$
    – Guilherme
    Jun 9 at 11:08
  • \$\begingroup\$ I've edited the question \$\endgroup\$
    – Guilherme
    Jun 9 at 11:27
  • \$\begingroup\$ You cannot achieve 220V between phas-neutral directy. || Transistor's answer correctly tells you what CAN be achieved technically. \$\endgroup\$
    – Russell McMahon
    Jun 11 at 2:05
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Note, the question has been substantially edited making this portion of my answer seem irrelevant.

No. Never split loads across two sockets. If a plug comes out the pins may be live and present an electric shock hazard.

You may already have 220 V available but you have no location code in your user profile or in your question so further help is not possible.


Answering the updated question:

In my state, theres delta-star transformers that outputs 3-wires with 127v phase-neutral voltage for all buildings. I've heard that one of these wires of the triphasic (R,S,T wires) and the neutral wire, outputs 220v, for easy maintening purposes (phase balancing) by the dealership.

If it is 3-phase with 127 V phase-neutral then each phase will be 127 V phase-neutral so you can't expect 220 V. Phase balancing is only possible by balancing the load, not the supply.

With 127 V phase-neutral you can get \$127\sqrt 3 \ \text V = 220 V\$ between phases. If this is to be plug connected then a single 3-phase connector must be used to prevent the possibility of one plug being disconnected and having the pins live. Please don't mess or take chances with this.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Dear, electric shock hazard ever have. The question is, work or not work? Being all wires of the same transformer. \$\endgroup\$
    – Guilherme
    Jun 8 at 18:43
  • \$\begingroup\$ Sorry, I will not help you create a dangerous situation. \$\endgroup\$
    – Transistor
    Jun 8 at 18:45
  • \$\begingroup\$ Sorry, i misspelled the question. May be now more clearly. \$\endgroup\$
    – Guilherme
    Jun 10 at 13:16

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