1
\$\begingroup\$

Is there any chemical or electro galvanic process which a medium-experienced electric amateur can use to create high-current PCB for MOS transistors?

I've tried excessive soldering to create additional conductive layer but it looks ugly.

I've simple one-layer or two-layer PCB and access to simple chemicals like copper vitriol and sulfate.

\$\endgroup\$
4
  • 6
    \$\begingroup\$ Just solder some solid copper wire along the tracks that need to carry a higher current. Far better conductor than just solder. \$\endgroup\$ – HandyHowie Jun 14 at 10:58
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ I do the same as @HandyHowie suggested. \$\endgroup\$ – KASPAROLDENDORFF Jun 14 at 11:12
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Ditto, see the example in Connor Wolfs's answer (all the way at the bottom) here: electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/52487/… \$\endgroup\$ – Bimpelrekkie Jun 14 at 11:23
  • \$\begingroup\$ And adding a solid copper wire is a method I have used to repair broken tracks - especially on some cars... \$\endgroup\$ – Solar Mike Jun 14 at 11:42
2
\$\begingroup\$

I've seen people using old etching liquid based on Sodium persulfate. The copper sulfate in a used solution can be used to electrochemically deposit the copper on a PCB.

The results, at least the ones I've seen, are not that great and have a very rough surface. Depending on your impurities it will also lower the quality. But with a pure copper solution it should work quite well.

Another way is using a chemical deposition of solder. There are sets available online for Sn surface finishing of PCBs. I've bought one on ebay a few years back but didn't really use it as it was too messy.


Many PCB manufacurers offer you to use a thicker copper layer 2 oz instead of 1 oz. The proper way is of course to design your traces in a way that they don't need reinforcement.

With homemade boards I also had the problem a few times and I soldered thick copper wire (1.5 mm2) on top of the traces. Imho, this doesn't look to bad if you complete flood everything in solder. With lead free solder it can be a little bit painful and I recommend using enough flux.

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.