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I need to use this potentiometer:

enter image description here (Vishay 534-11103)

…on my board but I don't know how I can do that. I appreciate any ideas or replacement suggestions.

Manufacturer's datasheet link here.


As asked in comments:

Why do you want to mount it on your PCB?

Customer requirement. They are in love with this potentiometer.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Why do you want to mount it on your PCB? What will the PCB be mounted in? \$\endgroup\$
    – HandyHowie
    Jun 15 at 8:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ customer reuqirement. they are in love with this potentiometer:D \$\endgroup\$
    – bcicek
    Jun 15 at 8:42
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    \$\begingroup\$ I have quite some experience of trying to attach similar Vishay pots to PCBs and it is a really bad idea. Either pick a version meant to be through-hole mounted or solder wires to it. \$\endgroup\$
    – Lundin
    Jun 15 at 12:48
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    \$\begingroup\$ That really depends where you want to mount it on the PCB, which depends on how the PCB will be mounted in the enclosure... Do you have requirements about that, or does the pot determine the whole mechanical design? That would be weird. Are audiophiles involved? \$\endgroup\$
    – bobflux
    Jun 15 at 14:20
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    \$\begingroup\$ @bcicek That doesn't answer the question of why it needs to go on the PCB. It's a panel mount pot... so why don't you want to panel mount it? \$\endgroup\$
    – J...
    Jun 16 at 19:44
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Best way would be to panel mount it, and then solder on three wires which you bring to the board, either directly solder them or use a 3 pin connector. This pot is not designed to be PCB mounted.

Or choose another pot, of course.

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Mount the pot to the board (using its intended mounting nut) and wire it from the reverse side.

Edit: I suggest mounting it to the board because it is a "customer requirement" that this board and pot be used. Of course board-mounting a panel-mount pot is not ideal, but I have seen a few instances of this. Usually these are "trimpots" with short (no) shaft length. For infrequent use, it seems to be OK. Still, this is "a hack."

  • The end is slotted, so can be adjusted with a screwdriver. If that's how it is being used, a shorter shaft would likely be better.
  • If a knob must be used, a smaller one will likely reduce radial forces on the PCB.
  • Don't use a lockwasher against the PCB, even if plated-through (which it should be) — it will tear it up. Use a flat washer against the PCB and lockwasher on top of that. A little medium threadlocker on the nut (or even a drop of selastic or hot-melt-glue) will ensure it won't wiggle loose.
  • Note this model doesn't seem to have an indexing tang or "D". I'd consider one that did, to ensure it can't spin once mounted. FR4 is more elastic than metal, so getting a really tight fit is harder.
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    \$\begingroup\$ This means that the PCB will catch all the mechanical strain. Not a great idea either. \$\endgroup\$
    – Lundin
    Jun 16 at 10:26
  • \$\begingroup\$ How about the panel catching it... as intended with this pot model. PCB strain can cause all manner of subtle and severe problems, such as shorts in the middle layers. That is very unsexy to trouble-shoot. \$\endgroup\$
    – Lundin
    Jun 16 at 11:58
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I would place 3 individual header pins snapped off from from these:
enter image description here
https://www.digikey.com/catalog/en/partgroup/break-away-0-1-36-pin-strip-male-header/88887
positioned on your PCB such that the hole in each of the solder tabs on the the pot slides over a pin, and the back of the pot lies flat against the PCB.
I'd probably also glue the pot onto the PCB - maybe a dot of holt-melt glue would work - possibly also make some holes in the PCB underneath the pot for the glue to 'grip' onto.

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    \$\begingroup\$ If you look at the datasheet then one of your header pins will go through both tabs 1 & 3. \$\endgroup\$ Jun 15 at 21:09
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I designed a product some years ago that used a similar potentiometer. I designed a snap-off board that had slots for the terminals. A flat cable connected the sub-board to the main board. The assembly could be tested before the sub-board was snapped off.

You can connectorize it.

Or just use it the way it is intended, soldered wires to the board (with heat shrink tubing if you want it to look nice), with or without a connector at the PCB end (but if you don't use a connector, add some form of strain relief/vibration control). You could add cable lacing for that old-timey look (jk).

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solder a steel bracket to the PCB and mount the potentiometer in the bracket.

you could have slots in the the PCB and solder the wiring tabs in there but that would probably be unreliable.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Soldering steel to a normal pc board is NOT a good idea. The fluxes and temperatures required are not something you want to deal with. If the bracket is nickel-plated you could give it a try. But not plain steel. \$\endgroup\$ Jun 17 at 12:24
  • \$\begingroup\$ True, I should have said. zinc or tin plated steel solders just fine at normal temperatures. (this is the stuff used in most electronics manufacture), as you say nickel plated like is used for battery contacts is also easily solderable. \$\endgroup\$
    – Jasen
    Jun 18 at 12:23
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For mounting, glue it down using a neutral cure silicone rubber.

For connecting to your circuit a few bodge wires should suffice.

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I mean yes technically you can mount them on PCB look at this link https://www.indiamart.com/proddetail/potentiometer-with-relay-pcb-22892358573.html

You will have a hard time soldering and even harder time when you want to replace them. Also, look at its weight(and weight distribution). you can also mount a PCB on it but that'd still require soldering wire.

The best thing is to solder wires as other answers suggest.

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The best way is to bend the potentiometer contacts back, and pass a wire that is soldered between the potentiometer and the PCB. Then secure the potentiometer with a plastic seal to the PCB. To make it more firm, you can put silicone glue between the potentiometer and the PCB.

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