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I have a very simple schematic layout which is for a board that gets 5V from a header pin, supplies 2 TRS audio jacks (J1, J2) and carries analog output from these jacks to an output through different header pins.

I'm trying to make convert this schematic into a PCB and I get the following error and I couldn't figure out how to resolve this. Help would be appreciated!

enter image description here

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    \$\begingroup\$ The ports (yellow boxes) are not components, and they do not have pins. The 5V_IN net does not have an error because it is connected to both J1 and J2. \$\endgroup\$
    – Troutdog
    Jun 18 at 20:42
  • \$\begingroup\$ How do I indicate that there is 5V input and analog output through header pins which are to be connected and sautered through the PCB? \$\endgroup\$
    – Kevin
    Jun 18 at 20:45
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    \$\begingroup\$ Well, you need proper schematic symbols for that. You can probably find 1,2 or 3 pin headers in the Manufacturer's part search panel, or you can make your own. \$\endgroup\$
    – Troutdog
    Jun 18 at 20:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ To be more explicit, you need to make a schematic symbol for your header. Then connect J1 pin 3 to your header. This is how you indicate that J1 pin 3 is connected to a header. This will prevent it from being a single pin net. If you think about it, single pin nets are pretty much always an error. If a trace does not go from one place to another, it serves no purpose and should be omitted altogether. But more often, it means there is some minor error like a typo on a net name or a wire with a small break in it somehow. \$\endgroup\$
    – mkeith
    Jun 18 at 23:35
  • \$\begingroup\$ FWIW --- Just because Altium issues you an 'error' doesn't mean you can't make a circuit board. It's an aid to avoiding simple errors, not an unbypassable rule maker. If the copper on your PCB makes the connections you want, it's all good. \$\endgroup\$
    – Kyle B
    Jun 19 at 5:05
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As @Troutdog says in the comments, you need a component (schematic symbol and footprint) to provide connection points for 5V IN, CH0, CH1, and Ground.

When I want to have points to solder wires to a board, I often use a 1 pin component on the schematic, and a footprint consisting of a single pad on the PC board (You may have to make both the schematic symbol and footprint).

Alternatively, you could use a four pin header schematic symbol and footprint, but the single pad footprint lets you set the hole size in the pad to your liking and place the footprint where most convenient.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Yeah you can create a testpad component or wire point component if you are not using an actual header. I have done this, too. Reference could be TP for testpad or WP for wire point. \$\endgroup\$
    – mkeith
    Jun 18 at 23:45
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    \$\begingroup\$ @mkeith: I like SP for solder pad. Footprints are llike SPAD35 for a pad with an 0.035" hole. \$\endgroup\$ Jun 18 at 23:55
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The problem probably lies with the component/footprint. Double check the component in the library and make sure it has 3 independently named pins. Make sure that the foot print also has 3 independently named pins and that they match the sch component library.

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If you are sure that these pins do not need to be connected anywhere then go to Project>Project Options. On the tab "Error Reporting" find "Nets with only one pin" and change it from Error to Warning.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Don't do that. It will eventually bite you. Single pin nets are always an error. \$\endgroup\$
    – mkeith
    Jun 18 at 23:32
  • \$\begingroup\$ I completely agree with mkeith. Don't do it unless you know what you're doing. \$\endgroup\$ Jun 18 at 23:38

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