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I got this part, and I am wondering if I could use it to use it to switch ~85V @ 3000Hz.

It's not working though, and the label on the chip says 50 Hz.

Is frequency the reason it's not working?

I have ~4.8V on the "Channel 1" pin (brown wire), but I cannot measure any output, nor does the EL-wire light up, that is attached (black wires.)

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    \$\begingroup\$ Have you verified the relay works with a voltage and frequency that matches the relays specifications? \$\endgroup\$ – HandyHowie Jun 23 at 18:12
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    \$\begingroup\$ Your results are what I would expect. The trigger circuit for the triac (internal to the relay) is designed for line frequencies and undoubtedly the triac in not rated for 3Khz. The label tells you 50/60Hz, that should be a big hint. \$\endgroup\$ – Gil Jun 23 at 20:06
  • \$\begingroup\$ Give it a try, see if you get the magic blue smoke. It's out of spec but it'll probably work unless you're worried about signal integrity \$\endgroup\$ – Persistence Jun 24 at 12:17
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The datasheet only says 50/60Hz and there are no frequency characteristics listed beyond that. It does say that its based off of the M0C2A-60 triac (of which there is no information for) but many triac circuits are 'tuned' with snubbers for zero crossing detection. A different frequency than 50/60Hz would interfere with the zero crossing operation.

I'd just say use a 'normal' relay. Another form of SSR that might work are the ones based off of FETs.

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There's no way of knowing; I'm more worried about the relay not turning off. What is certain is that it isn't specified for it.

Also, likely your 3 kHz signal is a power RF signal? You wouldn't want to push that through a non-linear element like a SSR.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I have read that for relaying AC in general, one would need an SSR. The signal is produced by a 12V inverter, used for EL wire. \$\endgroup\$ – Thomas Hirsch Jun 23 at 20:12
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    \$\begingroup\$ no, one doesn't. \$\endgroup\$ – Marcus Müller Jun 23 at 20:28

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