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1050

Could someone identify this part?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Where have U looked? \$\endgroup\$ Commented Jul 9, 2021 at 3:03
  • \$\begingroup\$ Since it's labelled "Q16" it's likely a transistor (or pair of them). Some context, like what the circuit does and what that part is connected to would be helpful. \$\endgroup\$
    – brhans
    Commented Jul 9, 2021 at 3:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ @TonyStewartEE75 Its located before the DC IN Jack 19V \$\endgroup\$
    – kleultsof
    Commented Jul 9, 2021 at 4:46
  • \$\begingroup\$ @brhans imgur.com/a/CbRkxLl This is the first gen showing 10552, \$\endgroup\$
    – kleultsof
    Commented Jul 9, 2021 at 4:47
  • \$\begingroup\$ You can diode test every pin and report back \$\endgroup\$ Commented Jul 9, 2021 at 5:19

1 Answer 1

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Referring to the wider image (cropped):

enter image description here

I've rotated it for as-yet no obvious reason, but we see U15 is a "TI" chip with "53015" on it. This is a TPS53015, a synchronous buck converter in MSOP-10 package. Two external transistors are used, likely Q16 (the question) and Q15 (unreadable). Q15 is larger, probably because the output voltage is quite low (3.3 to 5V, perhaps?).

Taking a look at the datasheet application section, we find a suggested layout:

enter image description here

Looks very familiar to the rotated view; it's likely they followed this reference. Q16 then must be a SOT-23-6 N-MOSFET. It seems to have the standard footprint.

Unfortunately, I haven't found a likely ID for the transistor. By the description, it's very likely N-ch, 30 or 40V, and some number of amperes.

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