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Guys I'm having difficulties regarding a light drive, I'll report the problem and what I did to try to solve this situation.

The light driver is being placed in an LED fixture, when you clear a phase (using interrupted or forcing a phase out), the LED is lit, it stays lit very dimly. And when you touch with your hands or the earth in the structure area of the luminaire (housing) it increases a little over brightness.

Checking the board (light drive), when it eliminates a phase it still manages to release a small amount of voltage with fluctuations (strange and curious).

The following situations that have to be solved: I studied the circuit, unfortunately it is a black box, because the integrated does not have the code that describes the component, so the following methods were used, T filter, I used a coil at the input and output of all people and cores, input capacitor, I used a circuit that isolates the positive or negative output of the drive.

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Without much success I appealed to creativity. I bought two MOC 3021 photo couplers on each output, I isolated positive and negative, that way I managed to eliminate the luminosity that shouldn't be there in the absence of a phase, but I turned on the MOC directly and evidently it heated a lot. So I took one and at the MOC output, I connected 2 BT134 to the same form as the MOC previously, to my surprise instead of solving the problem it returned to the initial state of the problem. No heating, but the initial problem returned.

Summary: It works two MOC directly connected but high heating occurs. Another MOC method occurs lighting.

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I would like some help regarding the subject.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Are you using a dimmer switch? They often cause similar problems with LED lights. \$\endgroup\$
    – user253751
    Jul 14, 2021 at 16:42
  • \$\begingroup\$ Very common issue. Can you add a tiny load in parallel with your driver (on the mains side)? \$\endgroup\$
    – winny
    Jul 14, 2021 at 16:43
  • \$\begingroup\$ The LED driver is made cheap as this could be fixed by one resistor. Your mains wiring just have capacitive coupling, so as wires go next to each other, there is capacitance between a live wire and wire that has been turned off from a switch, and this capacitive charge transfer between wires can keep light dimly lit. Maybe add an external resistor between live and neutral at the LED driver input (warning: not just any resistor, but a resistor, or multiple resistors in series, than can handle mains voltage safely) \$\endgroup\$
    – Justme
    Jul 14, 2021 at 20:03
  • \$\begingroup\$ @winny I did it before (series and parallel) \$\endgroup\$
    – LUFER
    Jul 15, 2021 at 20:13
  • \$\begingroup\$ Justme Varistor... I didn't use it, I believe it makes no difference, but I'm going to do a test. \$\endgroup\$
    – LUFER
    Jul 15, 2021 at 20:16

1 Answer 1

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This isn't a full answer but I can see a couple of problems:

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Figure 1. The luminaria is driven from BAT1, a DC supply. The MOC3021 is an opto-triac and is for switching AC. If it turns on it is likely that it will not turn off until BAT1 is disconnected.

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Figure 2. The gate of a triac should be switched positive relative to MT2 (the bottom pin). This circuit might work (on AC) but it is not good design practice.

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