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I recently got stuck on heating up a resistance wire. I have 80cm long resistance wire (from hair dryer) that I need to heat up to about 160°C. Currently I have a battery pack that produces 33.6V DC and the wire gets heated up to around 80°C. What can I do to get that desired 160°C? Of course I know, that increasing the voltage by adding more cells to the battery pack would help, but I do not want to do that. I'm trying to make it as compact as possible. Should I use a boost convertor? Or maybe an DC/AC invertor (I've seen, that those can make 230V AC from 12V DC)?

Thanks and have a nice day, Papouc!

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    \$\begingroup\$ Fold the wire in half -> its resistance will be decreased to 1/4 of what it was -> current flowing through it increases by 4x -> power dissipated increases by 4x. \$\endgroup\$
    – brhans
    Aug 17 '21 at 14:53
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If current is not a problem to you, simply reduce the length of the wire. If you fold it like @brhans mentioned you will have a wire with half the length and double the thickness, meaning the resistance will be smaller and there will be more current flowing through, thus increasing the heat.

If you want to, you can also just cut the wire in half and that should cut it's resistance by (approx.) half too and increase the current.

One last detail: These resistive wires have a working temperature, if you let it heat more than what it was designed for, it might break.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Great, thanks a lot! Much simpler than I initially thought. \$\endgroup\$
    – Papouc
    Aug 17 '21 at 15:22

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