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A DIAC looks like a diode.

A TRIAC looks like transistor.

I have project that uses a DB3 and a BT136, but the BD3 is not available in the local market.

Can I cut the gate terminal off of a BT136 to make a BD3, just like we can make a "transistor as diode?" I have noted both (TRIAC/DIAC) have MT1 and MT2, where as TRAIC BT136 has an extra G terminal.

If the answer is no, how can I make alternative to a DIAC when it is not available?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ a phase shifting RCRC dimmer pot to a small current bridge rectifier to an MC3021 Triac can trigger a Triac, but with this much trouble, DIAC’s make it easy, so just buy a dimmer. \$\endgroup\$ Commented Aug 20, 2021 at 21:13
  • \$\begingroup\$ Does the diac need to be bidirectional? \$\endgroup\$
    – Mattman944
    Commented Aug 20, 2021 at 23:22

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Diac and Triac work in different operating principles.

DIAC (diode for alternating current) is a diode that conducts electrical current only after its breakover voltage.
TRIAC (triode for alternating current) is a component that conducts current in either direction when triggered.

Thus, it is not straight forward to replace a DIAC with a TRIAC, however possible it can be.

"diode that conducts electrical current only after its breakover voltage" is the keyword.

You may simply replace a Diac with two Zener diodes back to back in series. However, unlike a Diac, the voltage accross back-to-bak-Zener does not fallback after brakeover voltage reached.

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