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I would like to know what the max current consumption of the W5500 module is so I can size an appropriate voltage regulator. When I looked into the datasheet I have found something that made me second guess.

Under the absolute maximum electrical characteristics of the datasheet

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It is stated that the max current consumption of this chip is 5mA, so I assumed that that is it.

but when i scrolled down I find this

enter image description here

enter image description here

So which one is it? It is written under "Power Dissipation" given with what the absolute maximum rating say, I can only surmise that that current is coming from somewhere else

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    \$\begingroup\$ this is a pretty crap datasheet, and the hardware design guide is no better (wizwiki.net/wiki/doku.php/…). From these documents, its impossible to say with certainty what the absolute maximum power draw is. I would either contact them, or, if thats impossible, design for the max typical plus 50%, although even that could be wrong. The correct thing to do here would be not to use a chip from such a crap vendor \$\endgroup\$
    – BeB00
    Sep 24 at 19:35
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    \$\begingroup\$ They say here that the value is typ+10% (forum.wiznet.io/t/topic/3453/4) but not sure if i really trust such a half assed company \$\endgroup\$
    – BeB00
    Sep 24 at 19:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ @BeB00 Sadly nothing i can really do here since this what arduinos uses, i do not know how to write my own library for a custom 100MBPS ethernet. ill just use a 300-500mA regulator then, since my digital cicuit really needs less than 10mA, 300mA regulators are cheap anyway. \$\endgroup\$
    – DrakeJest
    Sep 24 at 19:53
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The "Absolute Maximum Ratings" are not meant to represent performance, but conditions under which the device won't break. The 5mA appears to be an input current, not a supply current...it's the amount of current you can force into an input before it fails. I think if you plan for 132mA, and specify a 200mA supply just to have some overhead, it should be fine.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Also the output currents are per output pin. The Power Dissipation figures are the ones you need (although they actually list current rather than power). \$\endgroup\$
    – Frog
    Sep 24 at 20:59

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