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I have a simple question... If I have this 3 Phase breaker:enter image description here

That means its current limit is 20A right? My question is, is it limit for the whole breaker or limit for every phase separately?... What Iam trying to do is to connect three 2kW cookers, so total of 6kW power. So when it would be for whole breaker the maximum power would be 230x20=4600W that is too low... and when it would be for each phase it would be 3x(230x20)=13800W

Thanks a lot... Jirka

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    \$\begingroup\$ There is a steel rod though them to form a three phase group. If any one phase is over the trip current, that will force the other two to trip as well. \$\endgroup\$
    – winny
    Commented Oct 12, 2021 at 19:54
  • \$\begingroup\$ Here is 3 separate breakers. Tripping one of them cause disconnect all 3 circuit. \$\endgroup\$
    – user263983
    Commented Oct 12, 2021 at 20:43
  • \$\begingroup\$ As your cookers are single-phase check your local wiring regulations to see if you need to replace your 3-phase breaker with 3 single-phase breakers and associated wiring changes e.g. extra neutrals. \$\endgroup\$
    – Graham Nye
    Commented Oct 12, 2021 at 23:58

1 Answer 1

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That means its current limit is 20A right?

That means each phase has a 20 A trip level.

What I am trying to do is to connect three 2 kW cookers, so total of 6 kW. So when ... it would be for each phase it would be 3 × 230 × 20 = 13800 W

Correct.

2 kW on a 230 V supply should draw 2000 / 230 = 8.7 A. If you balance the loads across the phases you should be fine. Don't forget that you need to connect between phase and neutral.

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